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  • Under Assessment
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Ceriporia amazonica A.M.S. Soares, Sotão & Ryvarden

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Scientific name
Ceriporia amazonica
Author
A.M.S. Soares, Sotão & Ryvarden
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Polyporales
Family
Irpicaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT A3c
Proposed by
Adriene Mayra Soares
Comments etc.
Adriene Mayra Soares
Reviewers
Gregory Mueller

Assessment Notes

Justification

Ceriporia amazonica is endemic to the Brazilian Amazon.  It is a wood-inhabiting saprotropic fungus that causes white rot, characterized by a vivid salmon color. The species has only been recorded from two sites, each with few individuals, even with surveys for the species at the type locality and other areas of Eastern Amazonia since 2009. Thus, the species is potentially rare.  It has only been recorded 12 times but considering the large area of the Amazonian Forest, there are an estimated 1,000 - 2000 additiona sites where the species occurs, each with 4-8 mature individuals. The total population size is inferred to be less than 50,000. A population decline of 22% is expected for the next 30 years (three generations), based on the loss of suitable habitat and the putative influence that habitat degradation has on species occupation in a given environment The species is assessed as Near Threatened under criterion A3c.


Taxonomic notes

Ceriporia amazonica A.M.S. Soares, Sotão & Ryvarden, in Soares, Sotão, Ryvarden & Gibertoni, Phytotaxa 175(3): 177 (2014)


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Ceriporia amazonica is a wood-inhabiting saprophytic fungus that causes white rot, characterized by a vivid salmon color, described from the Brazilian Amazonia. The species was recorded few times, even after several collections in the type locality and other areas of the Eastern Amazonia since 2009. Thus, the species is potentially rare.   


The species is known from the Eastern Brazilian Amazon, covered by ombrophilous dense rainforest. It was recorded 12 times and considering the large area of the Amazonia Forest, are estimated around 1,000 number of sites, each one with 4-8 mature individuals. The total population size is up to 24,000 mature individuals. A population decline of 22% is expected for the next 30 years (three generations), based in the loss of suitable habitat and the putative influence that habitat degradation has on species occupation in a given environment The species is assessed as Nearly Threatened under the criterion A3c.


Geographic range

The species is only known in Brazil from two sites in the Eastern Amazon, covered by ombrophilous dense rain forest, in Serra do Navio and Floresta Nacional (FLONA) do Amapá, both areas in the Amapá state (Soares et al. 2014; Xavier et al. 2018; speciesLink, 2021). These two sites are separated by over 60 km.  The species is endemic to the Amazon forest domain, potentially restricted to the Eastern Brazilian Amazon.


Population and Trends

A total of 12 records are registered according to the databases for fungi in Brazil and scientific research (Xavier et al. 2018; speciesLink, 2021). Only one collection was recorded when the species was described (Soares et al. 2014). After several surveys in the type locality (FLONA do Amapá), the species was only found in 2014 (eight specimens) and Serra do Navio (three specimens) in the same year. Although other areas of the Brazilian Amazon were sampled in the same period, and the high detectability of the species – bright salmon basidiomata –, it was only found in these two areas of Amapá.
Considering the large area of the Brazilian Amazon, approximately 1,000- 2,000 sites of occurrence are estimated, each one with 4-8 mature individuals. Hence, the total population is estimated to be no more than 50,000 mature individuals. A population decline of 22% is expected for the next 30 years (three generations), based in the loss of suitable habitat (Zhang et al. 2015) and the putative influence that habitat degradation has on species occupation in a given environment (Berglund & Jonsson 2002, Haddad et al. 2015).

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Ceriporia amazonica is a wood-inhabiting saprophytic fungus that causes white rot on dead wood. The species occurs in logs and branches of dead wood, but no host information is known. It is registered only from Dense Ombrophilous forest in the Brazilian Amazonia.

Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland Forest

Threats

Brazil has the largest area of the Amazon Forest with vast areas at risk due to human pressure. In several areas of Brazilian Amazon, almost 20% of the original forest was devastated due to increased fire frequency, pasture, agriculture, mineral extraction, urban expansion and illegal logging (Fearnside 2015; Aguiar et al. 2016; Gomes et al. 2019). Ongoing deforestation and habitat loss are the main threats to Amazon diversity. In 2020, the deforestation rate of the Amazonia was the highest in the decade (Silva-Junior et al. 2020). In mining sites, one of the areas where the species was collected (Serra do Navio), after mineral extraction occurs changes in the landscape, deforestation, and replacement of native species by exotic species which can be harmful to many species (Monteiro 2003). Moreover, even in protected areas, deforestation for logging and pastures for cattle raising and small-scale gold mining which cause pollution and forests damages also occurs (Ferreira 2015; Jesus and Catojo 2020).

Housing & urban areasSmall-holder farmingAgro-industry farmingSmall-holder plantationsAgro-industry plantationsSmall-holder grazing, ranching or farmingAgro-industry grazing, ranching or farmingMining & quarryingUnintentional effects: subsistence/small scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Unintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Increase in fire frequency/intensitySeepage from mining

Conservation Actions

Even species in protected areas may be threatened. Management plans and emergency action plans to stop illegal logging in conservation units and mandate reforestation of mining sites with native species need to be enforced. Additionally, forest restoration to improve habitat quality is needed.

Site/area protectionResource & habitat protectionSite/area managementNational levelSub-national level

Research needed

More surveys are needed in other areas of the Brazilian Amazon, especially in the dry season to better understand the distribution of the species as well habitat and host specificity and other ecological aspects.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

None


Bibliography


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted