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  • Under Assessment
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Cantharellus phasmatis Foltz & T.J. Volk

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Scientific name
Cantharellus phasmatis
Author
Foltz & T.J. Volk
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Cantharellales
Family
Hydnaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
Noah Siegel
Assessors
Noah Siegel
Comments etc.
James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Cantharellus phasmatis is a species of golden chanterelle that was described from hardwood forests in Wisconsin, USA, and has also been recorded from DNA confirmed collections from Tennessee, and a number of photographic records from across the Midwest and Mid Atlantic regions.

Most historic records would have been recorded under the catchall name for golden chanterelles, Cantharellus cibarius. It also appears to be morphologically indistinct from Cantharellus deceptivus, and can only be reliably distinguished by TEF-1 sequence data. Thus data to assess population size and trends is lacking, but based on habitat, and range between sequenced confirmed collections, it is likely this species is widespread, common, and occurs in a stable habitat. Therefore, a Least Concern (LC) ranking is warranted.


Taxonomic notes

Cantharellus phasmatis was described from Wisconsin, USA (Foltz et al. 2013).

Currently, it is believed to be morphologically indistinct from Cantharellus deceptivus, and can only be distinguished by TEF-1 sequence data (Buyck et al. 2016). Although this belief is based on a low number of sequenced confirmed collections, and morphological differences may be noticed over time.


Previous to work published on golden chanterelles in North America (Buyck & Hofstetter 2011, Foltz et al. 2013), records of this species would have been recorded under the catchall name, Cantharellus cibarius.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Cantharellus phasmatis is a species of golden chanterelle that was described from hardwood forests in Wisconsin, USA, and has also been recorded from DNA confirmed collections from Tennessee, and a number of photographic records from across the Midwest and Mid Atlantic regions.

Most historic records would have been recorded under the catchall name for golden chanterelles, Cantharellus cibarius. It also appears to be morphologically indistinct from Cantharellus deceptivus, and can only be reliably distinguished by TEF-1 sequence data. Thus data to assess population size and trends is lacking, but based on habitat, and range between sequenced confirmed collections, it is likely this species is widespread, common, and occurs in a stable habitat. Therefore, a Least Concern (LC) ranking is warranted.


Geographic range

Geographic range remains poorly known for this species, due to lack of sequence-confirmed specimens. Currently it is known from sequenced collections from Wisconsin and Tennessee (MyCoPortal 2021), and photographed observations (Mushroom Observer 2021) from across the Midwest, into New England, south to Tennessee and North Carolina. Records from the southeast (growing with pine) appear to be a different species.


Population and Trends

Too little is known about Cantharellus phasmatis to make a robust assessment on population size and trends. Based on location where there are sequenced confirmed populations (Wisconsin and Tennessee), and the large number of photographic records across the Midwest and Mid Atlantic which likely pertain to this species (the look-alike Cantharellus deceptivus can only be distinguished by TEF-1 sequence data) suggest that population is widespread and stable.

Population Trend: Stable


Habitat and Ecology

Cantharellus phasmatis is an ectomycorrhizal species, associated with hardwoods; Foltz et al. (2013) report “gregarious to scattered; associated with Quercus (Fagaceae) and Carya (Juglandaceae)” Other collections appear to have been made in oak (Quercus spp.) forests. More sequenced confirmed collections with detailed habitat notes are needed to fully understand habitat requirements and restraints of this species.

Temperate Forest

Threats

No specific threats have been identified with regards to this species.


Conservation Actions

No specific conservation actions have been identified with regards to this species at this time.


Research needed

More documented collections of Cantharellus phasmatis, detailing habitat and tree association so we can better understand range and population extents of this species.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

Cantharellus phasmatis (and all other golden chanterelles in North America) are edible, and are indiscriminately collected by foragers and small scale commercial pickers.

Food - human

Bibliography

Buyck, B. and Hofstetter, V. 2011. The contribution of tef-1 se-quences to species delimitation in the Cantharellus cibarius complex in the southeastern USA. Fungal Diversity 49: 35–46

Buyck, B., Olariaga, I., Looney, B., Justice, J., and Hofstetter, V. 2016. Wisconsin chanterelles revisited and first indicationsf or very wide distributions of Cantharellus species in the United States East of the Rocky Mountains. Cryptogamie Mycologie 37(3): 345–366.

Foltz, M.J., Perez, K.E., and Volk, T.J. 2013. Molecular phylogenyand morphology reveal three new species of Cantharellus within 20 m of one another in western Wisconsin, USA. Mycologia 105: 447–461.

iNaturalist. 2021. http://www.inaturalist.org. Accessed on March 10.

Mushroom Observer. 2021. http://mushroomobserver.org. Accessed on March 10.

MyCoPortal. 2021. http://mycoportal.org/portal/index.php. Accessed on March 10.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted