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  • Under Assessment
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Guepiniopsis fulva Deliv.

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Scientific name
Guepiniopsis fulva
Author
Deliv.
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Dacrymycetes
Order
Dacrymycetales
Family
Dacrymycetaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
EN D
Proposed by
Odysseas Theodorou
Assessors
A. Martyn Ainsworth, Susana C. Gonçalves, Claudia Perini, Tatyana Svetasheva, Odysseas Theodorou
Editors
Claudia Perini, Odysseas Theodorou
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Guepiniopsis fulva is endemic to central Greece and restricted to the beech forest of Zygourolivado mountain.

Justification

Guepiniopsis fulva, a small fungus characterized by disk-shaped to cupulate often sessile fruiting bodies of fulvous colours, was observed on dead decorticated wood of beech on Zygourolivado mountain, in Central Greece. The European beech (Fagus sylvatica subsp. sylvatica) reaches here in the Balkan peninsula the southern limit of its distribution and faces a drought limitation. Climate change scenarios (IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007) predict changes in rainfall and temperature, which will negatively alter the water balance within given vegetation areas (Xystrakis, 2009). This fact can affect the populations of Fagus sylvatica at its drought limitation by reducing both its reproductive capacity (Gessier et al. 2007) and the vitality of mature individuals (Jump et al., 2006).
Moreover, in an inventory, one of the lowest volume of deadwood in beech forest was reported in the forests of Greece (0.7 m3 .ha-1) (UNECE/FAO 2000).
The fungal species, up to now not found elsewhere, can be considered strictly linked to this substrate together to this environmental variables.
We can consider Guepiniopsis fulva endemic to Greece and due to its very restricted population as vulnerable under criterion D1. The population size is also estimated to be very small (<250 mature individuals), and so the species also qualifies as Endangered under criterion D, and overall the species is assessed as Endangered.


Taxonomic notes

Guepiniopsis fulva was described in 2012 and is a rarely recorded fungus, that forms disk-shaped to cupulate fruiting bodies of fulvous colour. The genus is considered widespread. Guepiniopsis Pat. is a small genus in the family Dacrymycetaceae, comprising about eight species worldwide (He et al. 2019). The species of the genus, have been described according to the traditional system based on morphological and ecological criteria (Shirouzu et al. 2009, 2013,2017, Wu et al. 2011, Delivorias et al. 2012), due to absence of a phylogenetic-based classification system Dacrymycetes.
The significant microscopic distinctive features of G. fulva are its spore size and morphology, the rudimentary or completely lacking stipe and the sterile surfaces bearing thick-walled hyphae. Macroscopically, the main difference from other species of the genus is the fulvous colour of its fruitbodies. (Delivorias et al. 2012)


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Guepiniopsis fulva, a small fungus characterized by disk-shaped to cupulate often sessile fruiting bodies of fulvous colours, was observed on dead decorticated wood of beech in a mountain in Greece. The European beech (Fagus sylvatica subsp. sylvatica) reaches here in the Balkan peninsula the southern limit of its distribution and faces a drought limitation. Changes in rainfall and temperature can affect this vegetation; moreover one of the lowest volume of dead wood in the forest of Greece was reported in beech communities.
The fungal species, up to now not found elsewhere, can be considered strictly linked to this substrate together to this environmental variables.
We can consider Guepiniopsis fulva endemic to Greece and due to its very restricted population as vulnerable.


Geographic range

Guepiniopsis fulva appears to be endemic to the Zygourolivado mountain, in Central Greece. It was described in 2012, and since then only found in the same unique locality.


Population and Trends

Guepiniopsis fulva is currently known from one locality implying that this fungus is rare and relatively restricted in range. The limited number of records, from only one site also suggests a very small population size. The total number of trees that it occurs on is unlikely to exceed 125, and so the total population size is estimated to number < 250 mature individuals (see Dahlberg and Mueller 2011). Because it was described fairly recently (Delivorias et al. 2012),  it is not attainable to assess the population trend.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

The species appears to be wood-decaying, specifically associated with dead wood of Fagus sylvatica. It has been recorted on Zygourolivado mountain (alt. 1550 m), in a forest of Fagus sylvatica, where European beech reaches the southernmost point of its distribution in the Balkan peninsula and faces a drought limitation.

Temperate Forest

Threats

Despite the fact that the conservation status of beech forest in Greece is favorable, in a past inventory, one of the lowest volume of deadwood in beech forest was recorted in Greece (0.7 m3 .ha-1) (UNECE/FAO 2000) predominantly due to silvicultural treatment and management operations.
Moreover, the area of occupancy of the fungus, coincides with the southernmost point of the European beech’s distribution in the Balkan peninsula.  Climate change scenarios (IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007) predict changes in rainfall and temperature, which will negatively alter the water balance within given vegetation areas (Xystrakis, 2009). This fact can affect the populations of Fagus sylvatica at the southern range-edge of this species’ distribution, by decreasing the growth of adult trees (Jump et al., 2006). It is also implied that beech may lose its dominance and growing potential as compared to drought or flooding-tolerant species (Gessier et al. 2007). The above mentioned, suggest a pottential alteration of the fungus’ habitat.

Unintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Habitat shifting & alteration

Conservation Actions


Research needed

Research is needed on Guepiniopsis fulva to better understand its preferred habitat.
Furthermore it is essential need to search and identify,if possible, new localities of the species.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

Unknown

Bibliography

Dahlberg, A. and Mueller, G. 2011. Applying IUCN red-listing criteria for assessing and reporting on the
conservation status of fungal species. Fungal Ecology 4: 1-16.
Delivorias P, Gonou-Zagou Z, Kapsanaki-Gotsi E. 2012a. A new species of Guepiniopsis (Dacrymycetes) from Greece. Sydowia 64(1): 19–27.
Gessler, A., Keitel, C., Kreuzwieser, J., Matyssek, R., Seiler, W. & H. Rennenberg. 2007. Potential risks for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in a changing climate. Trees 21: 1-11.
He, M.-Q.; Zhao, R.-L.; Hyde, K.D.; Begerow, D.; Kemler, M.; Yurkov, A.; McKenzie, E.H.C.; Raspé, O.; Kakishima, M.; SánchezRamírez, S.; Notes, outline and divergence times of Basidiomycota. Fungal Divers. 2019, 99, 105–367.
IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergoverment
Jump, A.S., Hunt, J.M. & J. Peñuelas. 2006. Rapid climate change-related growth decline at the southern range edge of Fagus sylvatica. Global Change Biology 12: 2163-2174.
Shirouzu, T., Hirose, D. & Tokumasu, S. 2009. Taxonomic study of the Japanese Dacrymycetes. Persoonia 23: 16–34.
Shirouzu, T., Ishikawa, N.K., Hirose, D. & Maekawa, N.2013. A new Amazonian species of Calocera with dendroid and multi-headed basidiocarp. Mycoscience 54: 252–256.
UNECE/FAO, 2000. Forest resources of Europe, CIS, North America, Australia, Japan and New Zealand (Industrialized temperate/ boreal countries). UN-ECE/FAO Contribution to the Global Forest resources Assessment 2000. Main report. Geneva Timber and Forestry Study papers, No. 17. United Nations. New Yorkand Geneva, p. 445.
Wu, S.-H., Shih, K. & Yu, S.-Y.2011. Calocera bambusicola sp. nov. and C. sinensis newly recorded from Taiwan. Mycotaxon 115:163–169.
Xystrakis, F. 2009. The drought tolerance limit of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands on Mt. Olympus, NC Greece. Ph.D. Thesis. Freiburg.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted