• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Craterellus atrocinereus D. Arora & J.L. Frank

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Scientific name
Craterellus atrocinereus
Author
D. Arora & J.L. Frank
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Cantharellales
Family
Hydnaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
James Westrip
Assessors
Noah Siegel
Comments etc.
James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Craterellus atrocinereus is a rare Craterellus from California and Oregon, USA. Currently known from ~25 locations, from a habitat in decline.


Taxonomic notes

Craterellus atrocinereus was historically referred to by the European species, C. cinereus (Thiers 1985, Arora 1986).

The distinct western North American entity was described from a Type collection made in Santa Cruz County, California, USA (Frank 2015).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Craterellus atrocinereus is a rare Craterellus from California and Oregon, USA. Currently known from ~25 locations, from a habitat in decline.


Geographic range

Craterellus atrocinereus is known from Santa Cruz County, California, USA, north into Oregon; but reports are highly disjunct across this range.


Population and Trends

Distribution of this species is widespread, but it is rarely reported, and populations are highly disjunct.

Currently known from ~25 locations (exact locations are hidden on a few records, and this number could represent anywhere from 20-30 distinct populations) (iNaturalist 2021, Mushroom Observer 2021, and MyCoPortal 2021, where many are listed as Craterellus cinereus).

Data to fully assess population trends is lacking, but it is likely declining. Stand replacing fires, especially in the southern portion of the range have drastically altered habitat, likely making it ill-suited for Craterellus atrocinereus. As has the decline of Tanoak, and to a lesser extent, live oak, due to the introduced pathogen, Sudden Oak Death (Phytophthora ramorum).

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Craterellus atrocinereus is ectomycorrhizal with hardwoods; especially Tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus), Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) and Oregon White Oak (Q. garryana). Often scattered in small clusters or groups, fruiting in late winter and spring.

Temperate Forest

Threats

Local populations in the San Francisco Bay Area are under threat due to the introduced pathogen Sudden Oak Death (Phytophthora ramorum), which is killing large swaths of Tanoak, and to a lesser extent live oak.

Stand replacing fires, especially in the southern portion of the range have drastically alter habitat, likely making it ill-suited for Craterellus atrocinereus in the near term, and is likely detrimental to this species, due to the limited populations and spore production for re-introduction. 

Habitat decline due to urban development.

Housing & urban areasIncrease in fire frequency/intensityNamed species

Conservation Actions

Limit the spread of Sudden Oak Death in northern California forests.

Site/area protection

Research needed

Total extent of range, and population of this species, and more date to assess trends and threats.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

Craterellus atrocinereus is a highly desired edible species, and is collected by hobbyist foragers, although not specifically targeted like the common relative, C. calicornucopioides.

Food - human

Bibliography

Arora, D. 1986. Mushrooms Demystified. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, CA. 959 p.

Frank, J.L. 2015. Nomenclatural Novelties. Index Fungorum 249: 1.

iNaturalist. 2021. http://www.inaturalist.org. Accessed on March 02.

Mushroom Observer. 2021. http://www.mushroomobserver.org. Accessed on March 02.

MyCoPortal. 2021. http://mycoportal.org/portal/index.php. Accessed on March 02.

Siegel, N. and Schwarz, C. 2016. Mushrooms of the Redwood Coast. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, CA. 601 p.

Thiers, H.D. 1985. The Agaricales (Gilled Fungi) of California. 2. Cantharellaceae. Mad River Press: Eureka, CA. 34 p.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted