• Proposed
  • 2Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Rhizophagus intraradices (N.C. Schenck & G.S. Sm.) C. Walker & A. Schüßler

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Scientific name
Rhizophagus intraradices
Author
(N.C. Schenck & G.S. Sm.) C. Walker & A. Schüßler
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Unknown
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Glomeromycota
Class
Glomeromycetes
Order
Glomerales
Family
Glomeraceae
Assessment status
Proposed
Proposed by
Joana Veras
Comments etc.
Joana Veras

Assessment Notes

Taxonomic notes

Also known as Rhizoglomus intraradices or Glomus intraradices. Its spores are cream to yellowish brown, sometimes with a green hue. The color is highly variable in these shades. Irregularly shaped, with many elliptical spores. The outermost layer of the spore is hyaline, mucilagenic.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Due to the several records worldwide, we suggest this species to be categorized as Least Concern (LC).


Geographic range

Glomus intraradices is one of the most intensely studied arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Thus, it has a high occurrence, with registration in several countries worldwide. This is the first record of the species for Brazil, however it is well mentioned in different places.


Population and Trends

The ease of multiplying this species, allows a greater number of experiments to be carried out and a greater knowledge about the species. Thus, it is believed that it is capable of resisting a variability in environmental conditions, which corroborates with more registration of this species in other environments.

Population Trend:


Habitat and Ecology

In Brazil, this species is registered in different biomes, such as Amazon rainforest, Cerrado, Atlantic rainforest, Caatinga and Pantanal

Subtropical/Tropical Dry ForestDry Savanna

Threats

Rhizophagus intraradices is present in anthropized environments, high rates of anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation, can have an effect on the population of this species.

Housing & urban areasScale Unknown/UnrecordedUnintentional effects (species being assessed is not the target)

Conservation Actions

Rhizophagus intraradices is easy to propagate in trap culture in association with different host plants (leek, parsley, Bahia grass, sorghum, etc.) which can assist in species maintenance. However, to conserve the species in its natural environment it is necessary to preserve not only the fungus, but also the vegetation and the associated soil.

Site/area protectionResource & habitat protectionHabitat & natural process restoration

Research needed

Other areas should be studied to assess the distribution of this species. In addition to a greater understanding of the effects of human disturbances on the species.

Population size, distribution & trendsThreats

Use and Trade

Unknown

Bibliography

WINAGRASKI, Etienne et al. DIVERSITY OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS OF BRAZIL: A REVIEW. Cerne, v. 25, n. 1, p. 25-35, 2019.
JOBIM¹, KHADIJA; OLIVEIRA, BRUNA IOHANNA SANTOS; GOTO, BRUNO TOMIO. Checklist of the Glomeromycota in the Brazilian Savanna. 2016.
SUBRAMANIAN, Kizhareal S. et al. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoglomus intraradices on active and passive pools of carbon in long-term soil fertility gradients of maize based cropping system. Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, v. 65, n. 4, p. 549-565, 2019.
MAIA, Leonor Costa et al. Species diversity of Glomeromycota in Brazilian biomes. Sydowia, v. 72, p. 181-205, 2020.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted