• 1Proposed
  • 2Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Xanthoparmelia beccae Aptroot

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Scientific name
Xanthoparmelia beccae
Author
Aptroot
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Lichens
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Lecanoromycetes
Order
Lecanorales
Family
Parmeliaceae
Assessment status
Pending
Proposed by
André Aptroot
Assessors
Göran Thor
Editors
André Aptroot
Contributors
Craig Hilton-Taylor
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Sergio Perez-Ortega

Assessment Status Notes

Taxonomic notes

This species is unmistakable and recognizeable for all naturalists.

Thallus fruticose, much dissected into very fine, somewhat tubular, often branched lobes of c. 0.3 mm wide; upper surface yellowish-green; lower surface black; isidiate with isidia the same width as the lobes; medulla P+ red; KOH+ yellow/orange (not >red); apothecia unknown.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

This species grows only on gravelly places on the mid-elevations of the mountains on St Helena. It is subject to accidental extinction by trampling, collecting, road development, and locally over-grazing. It should be forbidden to collect, also for scientific research.

Criterion A: may apply: the largest known location, 1 of 4 known to date, is on the track of a scheduled road which is being built this year; there are certainly more than 4 locations though: some localities have not yet been discovered.
Criterion B. does not apply.
Criterion C: does not apply.
Criterion D: According to the known number of populations (4) and the estimated number (c. 10) we estimate the number of individuals <1000. Vulnerable according to D1.
The actual AOO is very likely <20km2 so it can assesed as Vulnerable according to D2.
Criterion E. does not apply.

We assess this species as Vulnerable according to criterion D1 & D2, and possibly also to A1a,c


Geographic range

Mid elevation (400 to 480 m) of mountains on St Helena, known from 4 localities on the N. and E. part of the island.


Population and Trends

The known population consists of at most a few dozen square meters in 4 stands; it is assumed that 2 to 3 times as many locations may exist.
The largest known locality is on a place that is being developed to build a road for the new airport. It can be assumed lost.

Population Trend: Deteriorating


Habitat and Ecology

On gravelly rocky soil, lying almost loose but not vagrant.

Temperate Shrubland

Threats

It is subject to accidental extinction by trampling, collecting, road development, and locally over-grazing. It should be forbidden to collect, also for scientific research.
The largest known locality is on a place that is being developed to build a road for the new airport. It can be assumed lost.

Small-holder grazing, ranching or farmingRoads & railroadsIntentional use (species being assessed is the target)Recreational activities

Conservation Actions

The population on the track of the road that is being built could be removed to a safe place nearby. This has actually been suggested, and it may or may not being carried out indeed.

Ex-situ conservation

Research needed

In order to assess the total existing population world wide, some areas of St Helena that have not yet been investigated for lichens should preferably be visited by a specialist.
This however is not exspected to have much influence on the Red List status.

Population size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade


Bibliography

Aptroot, A. 2012 Lichens of St Helena. SCES Publications, Kew. 116 pp.
Aptroot, A. 2008 Lichens of St Helena and Ascension Island. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 158: 147-171.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted