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Sticta alpinotropica Aptroot

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Scientific name
Sticta alpinotropica
Author
Aptroot
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Lichens
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Lecanoromycetes
Order
Peltigerales
Family
Lobariaceae
Assessment status
Published
Assessment date
2017-08-30
IUCN Red List Category
EN
IUCN Red List Criteria
D
Assessors
Thor, G. & Aptroot, A.
Reviewers
Scheidegger, C.

Assessment Notes

The content on this page is fetched from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/71670425/71670636

Justification

This species grows only in the summit area of a very high isolated mountain in the tropics. If the area would become subject to global warming, its natural niche (an oro-alpine situation) would vanish and the species would have no place to retreat to, and will be soon replaced by species that are adapted to milder climate in the unlikely case that it manages to adapt to a milder climate.

Criterion A does not apply.
Criterion B does not apply.
Criterion C does not apply.
Criterion D: Estimated population size acccording to the area occupied area is less than 250 individuals. So it can be assessed as Endangered under criterion D. 


Geographic range

Confined to the summit area of Mount Wilhelm, an isolated high mountain almost on the equator in Papua New Guinea. Grows at an altitude of ca. 4,200-4,300 m.

Population and Trends

It occurs in loose and dispersed stands, the total area of occupied by this species of the population is less than a few dozen square meters. The population is small and comprises fewer than 250 mature thalli.

Population Trend: unknown


Habitat and Ecology

Grows on bare rock, an unusual substrate for this genus. The species here fills the empty niche of the family Umbilicariaceae, which is absent from the region.

Threats

This species grows only in the summit area of a very high isolated mountain in the tropics. If the area would become subject to global warming, its natural niche (an oro-alpine situation) would vanish and the species would have no place to retreat to, and will be soon replaced by species that are adapted to milder climate in the unlikely case that it manages to adapt to a milder climate.

Conservation Actions

Reduce man’s impact on the climate that leads to global warming.

Source and Citation

Thor, G. & Aptroot, A. 2017. Sticta alpinotropica. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T71670425A71670636. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T71670425A71670636.en .Downloaded on 31 January 2021

Country occurrence