• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • ENPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Russula herrerae A. Kong, A. Montoya & Estrada

Go to another Suggested Species...

Scientific name
Russula herrerae
Author
A. Kong, A. Montoya & Estrada
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Russulales
Family
Russulaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
EN C1
Proposed by
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Assessors
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Gregory Mueller

Assessment Status Notes

This species was described by Kong et al. (2002), based on specimens collected between 1993 and 1996, from one locality with Quercus forest, at 2550-2650 m alt. The locality is in a suburban area, without conservation programs. Type locality is a small patch of Quercus forest, surrounded by farm fields.
Because of the extension of the Quercus altitude forest (above 2000m) in Mexico, is highly likely that some other localities may exist for this species.
The area from were this species was described has been studied since 1957 and up to 1283 records are available from GBIF (http://www.gbif.org), 948 of those were available prior to the description of the species, between the decades of 1980 and 1990, and even when so many records were available for the genus no additional locality was found. After the name was available (2002), additional 123 record for the genus were produced, and no additional record was found.
It is likely that this species is restricted to this locality and surrounding Quercus forest locations with similar characteristics. Additionally, models for climate change predict a rapid decline of 30-45% for this vegetation type over the next 30 years (Gomez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).

Justification

Supported on the available information, and the known localities, it is possible to estimate a total of 200 locations, with 10 individuals pre location for a total of 2000 mature individuals. Current model for the effect of climate change predicts a decline of the Quercus forest of high altitude (above 2000) on 30-45% in the next 30 years. Considering this conditions this species will be considered in the Endangered category under the criteria C1.


Taxonomic notes

This species was described by Montoya et al. (2002), since then nobody has propose any change on it nomenclature. So far we do not have any information regarding it phylogenetic relationships.
Current name
Russula herrerae A. Kong, A. Montoya & Estrada, Mycologia 94(2): 290 (2002)

Macroscopic description from the protologue. Microscopic description at
http://www.librifungorum.org/Image.asp?ItemID=629&ImageFileName=002/0290b.jpg
Pileus 50–100 mm broad, convex-umbilicate to convex-depressed when young, soon plano-depressed and finally subinfundibuliform; margin not striate, acute, incurved to arched in section, with floccose to fibrillose appendiculate marginal veil; pellis separable 1/4–1/2 way to disc, dull, dry, radially rugulose, unpolished, radially fibrillose-rimose, often laciniate at margin, smooth or minutely velvety at disc, at times becoming areolate around disc or forming concentric fibrillose squamules on margin in dry weather; initially white, soon developing pale yellow (4A3), yellow (2.5Y 8–7/6, 5Y 8/6; 10YR 8–7/6), brownish yellow (10YR 6/6), greyish yellow (4B4), light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4), yellowish brown (5E5, 5F5, 10YR 5/8), dark yellowish brown (10YR4/6), very pale brown (10YR 8–7/4), light brown (5D5, 5D6, 7D5), brown (6D7, 6E6), greyish brown (6E3), light reddish brown (2.5YR 6/4, 5yR 6/4) or reddish brown (8D5, 8C6) tints in age; remnants of the marginal veil with very pale brown (10YR 7/4), light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4), yellowish brown (10YR 5/4), light brown (5D5, 6D5, 6D6), brown (6E6), dark brown (6F7) tints, squamules with brownish yellow (10YR 6/6), yellowish brown (10YR 5/6), dark yellowish brown (10YR 4/6, 3/6) tints. Trama 3–8 mm thick at midradius, hard; white, unchanging when cut, often yellow (10Y R 7/8) brownish yellow (10Y R 6/8), light brown (5D6), yellowish brown (5E6, 10YR 5/8) or brown (6D7) around larva channels or at stipe base; odor indistinct, aromatic or fruity, at times disagreeable or fishy in age; taste mild or slightly acrid. Lamellae adnate to decurrent, distant to subdistant (60 lamellae reaching the stipe: f = 8–11.1–15) not or infrequently forked near stipe, intervenose, anastomosing near stipe or near pileus margin, with numerous lamellulae [mostly one lamellula between two lamellae: (0–)1(–3)]; acute or subacute in front, 2–8 mm broad, slightly thick, brittle; milk white (1A2), whitish (Ib), cream (IIc) to pale yellow (2A3), without bluish green tints; edge even, concolorous; taste acrid. Basidiospore deposit whitish to pale cream (Ib–IIa). Stipe 10–45 mm long, 10–25 mm thick, equal or tapered downward; surface dull, dry, longi- tudinally rugulose, unpolished, pruinose at apex, at times with brownish remnants of the marginal veil as floccose or fibrillose cortina-like structure; white, de- veloping grayish yellow (2B5), straw yellow (3B4), ver y pale brown (10Y R 8–7/6, 7/4), brownish yellow (10Y R 6/6), yellowish brown (10Y R 5/8), light brown (6D6) yellowish brown (5F7) or dark brown (6F7) tints in age; solid becoming cavernous.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

This species was described by Kong et al. (2002), based on specimens collected between 1993 and 1996, from one locality with Quercus forest, at 2550-2650 m alt. The locality is in a suburban area, without conservation programs. Type locality is a small patch of Quercus forest, surrounded by farm fields. The area from were this species was described has been studied since 1957 and up to 1283 records are available, 900 of those were available prior to the description of the species, and no additional locality was found. It is likely that this species is restricted to this locality and surrounding Quercus forest locations with similar characteristics. Additionally, models for climate change predict a rapid decline of 30-45% for this vegetation type over the next 30 years (Gomez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).


Geographic range

This species is only known from the type locality in Tlaxcala, Mexico. The locality is a small patch of Quercus forest surrounded by farm fields. Municipality of Panotla, 1km E of San Francisco Temezontla, 19°20’45"N, 98°16’25"W.


Population and Trends

Russula herrerae is only known from Mexico, and only has been collected from the type locality. Only has been collected eight times in the period from 1993-1996, and it has not been found on any other locality or even in the same place, for the last 21 years. Over the last 50 years the area, and surrounding areas, had been extensively collected for the genus Russula. GBIF (http://www.gbif.org) have 1771 records of Russula for Mexico, dating back to 1957, 1285 corresponds to the area of central and south Mexico (polygon coordinates South 17.0 North 21.0, West -110, East -92). From the period of 1980-1999, more than 900 records are available for the genus in that area, and may correspond to the background information available prior to the description of the species. After the name was available (2002), extra 123 records were added, but no additional one corresponds to the species. Supported on this information it is likely that the species is restricted to the Quercus forest nearby the type locality.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

This species is only known from one locality with Quercus forest at 2550-2650 m alt. Supported in the records available in GBIF for reports of Russula from Mexico, it is likely to assume that this species may be restricted to the Quercus forest in the type locality, and surrounding areas. Even when this type of forest is not the one under heaviest pressures in Mexico, models for climate change predict a rapid decline of 30-45% for this vegetation type over the next 30 years (Gomez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).


Threats

Main threats for this species came for its very limited distribution, only one locality. The locality is a reduced patch of Quercus forest, surrounded by farmland, and there is no protection or conservation programs that includes the type locality.  Models for the effects of climate change predicts a decline of 30-45% in this vegetation type over the next 30 years (Gomez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).

Housing & urban areas

Conservation Actions

Conservation actions are related with the conservation of the habitat. Current models for the effect of climate change predicts a severe effect over Quercus forest, with a decline of 30-45% over the next 30 years. Additional actions may include the actions for forest management as long as this species may be consumed by local people (Alonso-Aguilar et al. 2014).

Resource & habitat protectionHarvest management

Research needed

Research is needed mainly in taxonomic area, because we have no knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships of the species. Also ecological information is needed, in order to confirm possible ectomycorrhizal association with Quercus species.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade

So far this species is suspected to be consumed, only in local scale (Alonso-Aguilar et al. 2014).

Food - human

Bibliography

Alonso-Aguilar, L. E., Montoya, A., Kong, A., Estrada-Torres, A., & Garibay-Orijel, R. (2014). The cultural significance of wild mushrooms in San Mateo Huexoyucan, Tlaxcala, Mexico. Journal of ethnobiology and ethnomedicine, 10(1), 27.

Gómez-Mendoza L. & Arriaga, L. (2007). Modeling the effect of climate change on the distribution of oak and pine species of Mexico. Conservation Biology, 21(6), 1545-1555.

Kong, A., Montoya, A., & Estrada-Torres, A. (2002). Russula herrerae, a new species with marginal veil from Mexico. Mycologia, 94(2), 290-296.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted