• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Bacidia incompta var. incompta (Borrer ex Hook.) Anzi

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Scientific name
Bacidia incompta var. incompta
Author
(Borrer ex Hook.) Anzi
Common names
hůlkovka nezdobná
regenbaankorst
sap groove lichen
IUCN Specialist Group
Lichens
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Lecanoromycetes
Order
Lecanorales
Family
Ramalinaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
David Minter
Assessors
David Minter
Contributors
Sonia Ravera
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg

Assessment Status Notes

Taxonomic notes

The following infraspecific taxa have been described: B. incompta var. atrosanguinea Schaer., B. incompta var. leprifera Vain., B. incompta var. spissa (Shirley) Zahlbr., B. incompta forma decolorascens Arn., B. incompta forma flocculosa Vain., B. incompta forma luxurians Zahlbr., B. incompta forma minor Arn. and B. incompta forma prasina Arn. Of these, only B. incompta var. spissa is accepted by SpeciesFungorum [accessed 16 July 2013].


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Bacidia incompta is red listed as critically endangered in Germany (PRINTZEN ET AL., 2002), red listed as threatened in the Netherlands, red listed in Sweden (FRITZ, 2008), red listed as vulnerable in the UK, where it is a BAP priority species (WOODS & COPPINS, 2012) [http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/_speciespages/125.pdf], presumed extinct in Ireland [www.habitas.org.uk/lichenireland/species.asp?item=18230], and listed locally as endangered in Cornwall [www.cisfbr.org.uk/CRDB/StartCRDB.htm]. Over 90% of the records encountered for the present publication come from Sweden and the UK, both countries where this fungus is red listed. Using IUCN categories and criteria, Minter & Cannon (2013) evaluated this species globally as Endangered.


Geographic range

AFRICA: Tunisia. ASIA: Georgia, Tajikistan. ATLANTIC OCEAN: Portugal (Madeira), Spain (Canary Islands). EUROPE: Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Russia (Respublika Adygeya, Respublika Komi), Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, Ukraine. Native to Europe and western Asia, status elsewhere unclear; North American records [from Canada (Ontario) and USA (Minnesota, Wisconsin)] are probably based on misidentifications; records from the Caribbean [Cuba[, Pacific ocean [USA (Hawaii] and South America [Colombia] require confirmation. Records up to 170 m above sea level, but doubtless occurs higher.


Population and Trends

Death of mature elm trees as a result of Dutch elm disease has meant a significant loss of habitat for this species (WATSON ET AL., 1988). In the UK removal of hedgerows and their associated trees in the 1970s and 1980s also meant a significant loss of habitat for this fungus [www.plantlife.org.uk/uploads/documents/management-guide-Lichens-and-elm-trees.pdf]. Ash dieback caused by Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus Queloz, Grünig, Berndt, T. Kowalski, T.N. Sieber & Holdenr. (better known by the synonym Chalara fraxinea T. Kowalski) is likely to result in significant further loss of habitat as it spreads across Europe.

Population Trend: Deteriorating


Habitat and Ecology

Associated organisms as follows. Fungi. Cerothallia luteoalba (Turner) Arup, Frödén & Søchting. Plantae. Acer campestre L.; Alnus incana (L.) Moench (bark); Fagus sylvatica L. (bark); Fraxinus excelsior L., Fraxinus sp. (bark); Plantae indet. (bark, wood); Populus tremula L.; Quercus robur L.; Ulmus sp. (bark, root); Viburnum lantana L. (bark). Photobionts. Chlorococcoid green algae. A lichen-forming fungus growing on trunks of trees with alkaline bark, particularly Ulmus spp., but also species of Acer and Fraxinus, sometimes also on exposed roots; associated with wounds (e.g. from cut branches) and consequent sap weeping, trees below unstable cliffs liable to be hit by falling rocks, and old growth trees with wounds are examples of habitats. Associated trees have been observed in mixed woodland, parkland, unimproved grassland, and domestic gardens. Wayside trees are an important habitat because there is more light than in a forest environment, and dung and dust particles from the nearby road enrich their nutrient status (EDWARDS, 2002) although, on the basis of its distribution and overall rarity, the present species may be sensitive to nitrogen pollution. Bacidia incompta is often found on veteran trees, particularly those with hollow trunks, and may be an indicator of old-growth (EDWARDS, 2002; PRINTZEN ET AL., 2002). Nothing is known about interactions with animals. Apart from some information about associations with other lichen-forming fungi, nothing is known about interactions with other fungi.


Threats

Death of mature elm trees as a result of Dutch elm disease has meant a significant loss of habitat for this species (WATSON ET AL., 1988). In the UK removal of hedgerows and their associated trees in the 1970s and 1980s also meant a significant loss of habitat for this fungus [www.plantlife.org.uk/uploads/documents/management-guide-Lichens-and-elm-trees.pdf]. Ash dieback caused by Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus Queloz, Grünig, Berndt, T. Kowalski, T.N. Sieber & Holdenr. (better known by the synonym Chalara fraxinea T. Kowalski) is likely to result in significant further loss of habitat as it spreads across Europe.


Conservation Actions

In situ conservation actions. Protection of veteran trees and control of Hedera and other climbing plants which can reduce bark light levels. In the UK, regular monitoring of known sites, and artificial creation of sap weeps combined with research into colonization and establishment of wound-inhabiting lichens have been recommended [http://wales-lichens.org.uk/species-accounts/bacidia-incompta]. Ex situ conservation actions. One living strain of this species was found in a search of the Culture Collection Information Worldwide on-line catalogue [www.wfcc.info/ccinfo/home]. One sequence was found in a search of the NCBI, GenBank database [www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov].


Research needed


Use and Trade


Bibliography

EDWARDS, B.W. The past and present distribution of Bacidia incompta, Biatoridium monasteriense and Caloplaca luteoalba in England. [Plantlife Back from the Brink Project no. 190]. London: Plantlife (2002). FARKAS, E., LÖKÖS, L. & TÓTH, E. Bacidia species in Hungary. Sauteria 9: 133-142 (1998). FRITZ, Ö. Unique lichen flora in avenues at Sperlingsholm, southwestern Sweden. Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift 102 (1): 5-18 (2008). MINTER, D.W. & CANNON, P.F. Bacidia incompta. IMI Descriptions of Fungi and Bacteria No. 1951 (2013). MOTIEJŪNAITĖ, J., BERGLUND, T., CZARNOTA, P., HIMELBRANT, D., HÖGNABBA, F., KONOREVA, L.A., KORCHIKOV, E.S., KUBIAK, D., KUKWA, M., KUZNETSOVA, E., LEPPIK, E., LÕHMUS, P., LUKOŠIENĖ, I.P., PYKÄLÄ, J., STONČIUS, D., STEPANCHIKOVA, I., SUIJA, A., THELL, A., TSURYKAU, A. & WESTBERG, M. Lichens, lichenicolous and allied fungi found in Asveja Regional Park (Lithuania). Botanica Lithuanica 18 (2): 85-100 (2012). PRINTZEN, C., HALDA, J., PALICE, Z. & TØNSBERG, T. New and interesting lichen records from old-growth forest stands in the German National Park Bayerischer Wald. Nova Hedwigia 74 (1-2): 25-49 (2002). WATSON, M.F., HAWKSWORTH, D.L. & ROSE, F. Lichens on elms in the British Isles and the effect of Dutch elm disease on their status. Lichenologist 20 (4): 327-352 (1988). WOODS, R.G. & COPPINS, B.J. A Conservation Evaluation of British Lichens and Lichenicolous Fungi. Species Status [ISSN 1473-0154] 13: 156 pp., Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Peterborough (2012).


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted