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Phylloporus guzmanii Montoya & Bandala

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Scientific name
Phylloporus guzmanii
Author
Montoya & Bandala
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT A3c
Proposed by
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Assessors
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Editors
Gregory Mueller
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg

Assessment Status Notes

This species was described by Montoya and Bandala in 1991.  Their description was based on specimens collected in 1985 from four localities within tropical montane cloud (TMC) forests or transition to Pinus-Quercus forest, at 2000-2200 m alt. These remain the only known localities. One locality is in a State Park, surrounded by recreational areas, while the other three are outside of protected areas. The collection data do not include a description of the vegetation type, but all the localities are known to have TMC forest according to the CONABIO database (Ressl and Lara 2008), and the altitude of the collection sites coincide with habitat of TMC forest or a transition to Pinus-Quercus forest.

Based on climate change models, TMC forests are estimated to decline 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012), and Quercus species that inhabit temperate and montane locations are estimated to decline by 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriaga 2007).

Justification

Phylloporus guzmanii forms an obligate association (ectomycorrhiza) with Quercus trees and is known from only four localities occurring in tropical montane cloud (TMC) forest or in a transition to Pinus-Quercus forest, at 2000-2200 m alt. Based on climate change models, TMC forests are estimated to decline 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012), and Quercus species that inhabit temperate and montane locations are estimated to decline by 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriaga 2007). Therefore, it is assessed as VUA3c based on the anticipated decline in suitable habitat and its obligate host.  Because of its rareness and restricted distribution, it possibly could also be listed under B1 and C1, but the actual EOO and number of mature individuals are difficult to estimate without further extensive fieldwork. 


se of the number of localities it can be estimated a population of 4000 mature individuals, with a decline projected for the future.


Taxonomic notes

This species was described by Montoya and Bandala (1991).  There are no taxonomic issues, although its phylogenetic relationships with other species in the genus have not been examined. 

Phylloporus guzmanii Montoya & Bandala, Mycotaxon 41(2): 473 (1991)

 


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

This species was described by Montoya and Bandala (1991), typified with a specimen collected in 1985 from Parque Estatal Omiltemi, in Guerrero, Mexico. To date this species has been collected five times, from four different localities in three states (State of Mexico, Guerrero and Morelos). This species has been collected only from tropical montane cloud (TMC) forest, or in transition to Quercus and Pinus forest. Only one of the four known localities for this species (Omiltemi, Guerrero) is under some program of protection, State Park with recreational use, the other three localities are suburban areas.  Models for the effect of climate change predicts a decline of TMC forest in 68% over the next 60 years, and the decline of Quercus forest in 30-45% in the next 30 years.


Geographic range

This species is only known from Mexico. It was collected from STATE OF MEXICO: 10 kilometer from municipality of Valle de Bravo, road to Temascaltepec; GUERRERO: municipality of Taxco, 2km deviation to Cerro del Huizteco; Municipality of Chilpancingo Omiltemi State Park; MORELOS: Tepeite Valley NW Santa Maria.

EOO 7,496.039 km2
AOO 20.000 km2


Population and Trends

Phylloporus guzmanii is a species only known from four localities in Mexico, and it has been collected only five times.  All the localities have tropical montane cloud (TMC) forest or a transition to Pinus -Quercus forest. One of the localities is a State Park, under some level of protection, with recreational use, but the rest of the localities are suburban areas without conservation programs. Models for the effect of climatic change estimate a decline of the TMC forest of 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al 2012), and also the decline of Quercus forest in 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

This species is only known from tropical mountain cloud forest or a transition to Pinus-Quercus forest. The localities were it has been described do not describe with precision the vegetation type, but all the localities are known to have TMC forest according with CONABIO database (Ressl and Lara 2008), and because of the altitude of the collection sites it is likely to assume the presence of TMC forest or a transition to Pinus-Quercus forest. Three of the localities from were it is known are suburban areas without a protective status.

Temperate ForestSubtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

Main threats for this species came from its very limited distribution, only four localities, three in suburban unprotected areas, and the other in a recreational area inside a State Park. Also models for the effect of climatic change estimate a decline of the TMC forest of 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al 2012), and also the decline of Quercus forest in 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).

Housing & urban areasTourism & recreation areas

Conservation Actions

Conservation actions are related with the protection of the habitat. Models for the effect of climatic change estimate a decline of the TMC forest of 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al 2012), and also the decline of Quercus forest in 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriga 2007).

Resource & habitat protection

Research needed

Research is needed in the fields of taxonomy and distribution. More distributional data are needed, and studies with DNA for phylogenetic inference and molecular characterization for ecological studies.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade

The are no known uses or trade practices associated with this species .

Unknown

Bibliography

Gómez-Mendoza L. & Arriaga, L. (2007). Modeling the effect of climate change on the distribution of oak and pine species of Mexico. Conservation Biology, 21(6), 1545-1555.

Montoya, L., & Bandala, V. M. (1991). Studies on the genus Phylloporus in Mexico. I. Discussion of the known species and description of a new species and a new record. Mycotaxon, 41(2), 471-482.

Neves, M. A., & Halling, R. E. (2010). Study on species of Phylloporus I: Neotropics and North America. Mycologia, 102(4), 923-943.

Ponce-Reyes, R., Reynoso-Rosales, V. H., Watson, J. E., VanDerWal, J., Fuller, R. A., Pressey, R. L., & Possingham, H. P. (2012). Vulnerability of cloud forest reserves in Mexico to climate change. Nature Climate Change, 2(6), 448.

Ressl, R. y L. Lara Morales, 2008. Sistema de información sobre Bosque Mesófilo de Montaña de México para apoyo en programas de restauración (Fase 1). Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Informe final SNIB-CONABIO proyecto No. EQ007. México D. F.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted