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  • Under Assessment
  • Preliminary Assessed
  • NTAssessed
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Fistulinella wolfeana Singer & J. García

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Scientific name
Fistulinella wolfeana
Author
Singer & J. García
Common names
"Ushki jieth´e” in otomí dialect
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT A3c; B2b(ii,iii)
Proposed by
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Assessors
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Editors
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Contributors
Olivia Ayala Vàsquez

Assessment Notes

Fistulinella wolfeana is a common and conspicuous bolete endemic to eastern and southeastern Mexico, where it can be abundant in some places. Currently it does not match any of the IUCN criteria to be classified as threatened. However its habitat is very fragmented and the current AOO is approaching the vulnerable category. As Mexico has one of the highest deforestation rates in the world, it is very probable that it would be threatened in the future.

Justification

Projected AOO of Fistulinella wolfeana is 5000 km, if 1.1% deforestation rate in Mexico southeastern continue (Díaz-Gallegos et al 2010) it population could decrease 30% in 30 years, the life span of 3 generations (cf. Dahlberg & Mueller, 2011). With this deforestation rates, within 50 years the AOO of the species will be less than 2000 km2 with very poor habitat quality due to fragmentation. In consequence it is assessed as Near threatened A3c, B2b(ii,iii).


Taxonomic notes

Fistulinella wolfeana can be confused Tylopilus because both genera have rose tubes and pinkish pores, which change to orange or ochraceous reddish when touched. Tylopilus indecisus has a pale brown slightly reticulated stipe and thin spores (10.5-15.5 × 3.5-4.5). Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus has a very bitter taste and reticulated stipe surface. Tylopilus subcellulosus has narrower and shorter spores (9.5-12 × 3.5-4) and bitter taste. Additionally F. wolfeana has a viscid pileus, while all Tylopilus have pileus with subtomentosus, glabrous or smooth dry surface (Robles-García et al. 2016).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Fistulinella wolfeana is a common and conspicuous bolete endemic to eastern and southeastern Mexico. It develops in subtropical Quercus and Quercus-Pinus mixed forests. Mexico has one of the highest deforestation rates in the world, and subtropical oak and oak-pine mixed forests are rapidly disappearing and very fragmented. Even while the EOO if the species is large, its habitat is very fragmented and the projected AOO will approach the vulnerable category in the near future. Projected AOO of Fistulinella wolfeana is 5000 km, if 1.1% deforestation rate in Mexico southeastern continues its population could decrease 30% in 30 years, the life span of 3 generations. With this deforestation rates, within 50 years the AOO of the species will be less than 2000 km2 with very poor habitat quality due to fragmentation. In consequence it is assessed as Near threatened A3c, B2b(ii,iii).


Geographic range

Fistulinella wolfeana is only known from eastern and southeastern Mexico, mainly in the Eje Neovolcánico Transversal, and part of the Sierra Madre del Sur, in the states of Jalisco, Estado de Mexico, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Morelos, Queretaro and Oaxaca. It distributes in an altitude range of 1500-2300 m. Its know EOO is around 150,000 km2. Known subpopulations occupy and AOO of 1000 km2. Considering a five-fold increase its AOO rises to 5000 km2.


Population and Trends

There are 10 known subpopulations of F. wolfeana in Mexico. Five of them are located in Jalisco state; two of them the Bosque de la primavera and Zapopan subpopulations are in severe risk since they are threatened by the continuous hurbanization of Guadalajara city and yearly fires. The other three subpopulations (Tecatitlán, Volcán de colima and Atemajac) seem to be in good shape of conservation. In the state of Queretaro there is a subpopulation in the large and conserved area of el Zamorano, while the population in Amealco is severely fragmented. The subpopulation of nanchititla in the Estado de México is in good shape. In the state of oaxaca are two known subpopulations, one severy fragmented in San Antonio de la Cal and one in a large forest are in Sierra Mixe. Given the large EOO of the species it is likelly that it may have up to 50 potential subpopulations, however given the severe deforestation and fragmentation they are small and declining.

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Solitary and scattered. Fruits on ground in Quercus and mixed Quercus-Pinus forests. Altitude 1500-2300 m. Presumably ectomycorrhizal with Quercus liebmanii, Q. scytophylla and other Quercus spp (Villanueva et al 2008).

Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

Mexico has one of the highest deforestation rates worldwide. Temperate forests are ecosystems with high deforestation because of land-use change to agricultural or urban areas. At least halve of the subpopulations of F. wolfeana are threatened because forest deforestation, fragmentation and yearly fires due to their proximity to urban areas.

Housing & urban areasIntentional use (species being assessed is the target)Unintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Increase in fire frequency/intensity

Conservation Actions

Fistulinella wolfeana is not listed in any national or international Redlist. It is necessary to protect and enforce the conservation of areas like Bosque de la Primavera. This area is a natural protected area but huge intentional fires happen yearly and there resides one of the biggest F. wolfeana subpopulations.

Site/area protectionNational level

Research needed

No DNA sequences of the species are available on GenBank. DNA information is needed to broaden the sampling of the species and to locate more viable populations.

Population size, distribution & trendsPopulation trends

Use and Trade

Fistulinella wolfeana is marketed as an edible mushroom by Otomi people in Amealco municipality in the state of Queretaro.

Food - human

Bibliography

Ayala-Vásquez O (2016) Estudio taxonómico de la familia Boletaceae en bosques de Quercus del estado de Oaxaca, México. Tesis de Maestría. Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional. Ciudad de México.169 pp. 
García-Jiménez J (1999) Estudio sobre la Taxonomía, ecología y distribución de algunos hongos de la Familia Boletaceae (Basidiomycetes, Agaricales) de México. Tesis de Maestría (Biología). Facultad de Ciencias Forestales. Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. 270 pp.
Guzmán G (1974) El género Fistulinella Henn. (=Ixechinus Heim) y las relaciones florísticas entre México y África. Boletín Sociedad Mexicana de Micología. 8:53-64.
Dahlberg, A., & Mueller, G. M. (2011). Applying IUCN red-listing criteria for assessing and reporting on the conservation status of fungal species. Fungal ecology, 4(2), 147-162.
Díaz-Gallegos, J. R., Mas, J. F., & Velázquez, A. (2010). Trends of tropical deforestation in Southeast Mexico. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 31(2), 180-196.
Saldivar-Sánchez ÁE (2019) Actualización del Estudio Taxonómico de la Familia Boletaceae (fungi: Boletales) en Jalisco, México. Tesis de Licenciatura. Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias División de Ciencias Biológicas y Ambientales. Universidad de Guadalajara.
Robles-García D, Yahia E, García-Jiménez J, Esquivel-Naranjo EU, Landeros F (2016) First ethnomycological record of Fistulinella wolfeana as an edible species and some of its nutritional values. Revista Mexicana de Micología. 44: 31-39.
Robles-García D, Suzán-Azpiri H, Montoya-Esquivel A, García-Jiménez J, Esquivel-Naranjo EU, Yahia E, Landeros-Jaime F (2018) Ethnomycological knowledge in three communities in Amealco, Quéretaro, México. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine14:7. DOI 10.1186/s13002-017-0202-7
Singer R, García J, Gómez LD (1991) The Boletineae of Mexico and Central America III. Nova Hedwigia, Beihefte 102:1-99.
Villanueva, K.T., G.B. Williams, M. Herrera-Fonseca, A. Galván-Corona, O.R. Alcántar, 2008. Avances en el conocimiento de los hongos macromicetos del Cerro El Venado, Mezcala, Mpio. de Poncitlán, Jalisco. Avances en la Investigacion Cientifica en el CUCBA. XIX Semana Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara. Pp. 223-230.
Villaseñor JL, Ortiz E, Alvarado L, Mora M, Segura (2013) Base de datos SNIB-CONABIO proyecto No. JE012. Catálogo florístico taxonómico de los árboles de México. Instituto de Biología, UNAM. México, D. F.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted