• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • ENPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Xerocomus griseo-olivaceus McNabb

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Scientific name
Xerocomus griseo-olivaceus
Author
McNabb
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
EN D1
Proposed by
Jerry Cooper
Assessors
Jerry Cooper
Editors
Jerry Cooper
Comments etc.
Patrick Leonard

Assessment Notes

Justification

The estimated number of mature individuals is 150.


Taxonomic notes

Xerocomellus griseoolivaceus is known with certainty from the type locality in the north of North island New Zealand.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

A large bolete species associated with tea-tree under threat from land-use change and invasive species.


Geographic range


Population and Trends

Known with certainty only from 3 records all from the same general area. All known locations are in areas of bush directly adjacent to pasture farmland.

We infer the presence 3 genotypes, x 10 to account for undetected colonies, x 5 to convert to an estimate of 150 mature individuals. Area of Occupancy 4 km2

Population Trend:


Habitat and Ecology

Xerocomellus griseoolivaceus is ectomycorrhizal with tea-tree (myrtaceae). It appears to be restricted to areas with mature stands of tea-tree, and has a northern distribution.


Threats

The known area for this species is subject to increasing tourism from the nearby Auckland city with consequent increase in disturbance in the immediate areas. The populations are also likely to decrease over the next 20 years as the impact of Kauri die-back on Kauri forest alters the surrounding forest structure. Areas are also likely to be disturbed because of future disease management actions. The impact of changing farming practices in adjacent areas may have some impact on the quality of mycorrhizae.


Conservation Actions


Research needed

A number of ectomycorrhizal species associated with tea-tree (myrtaceae) in New Zealand are potentially impacted by changing agricultural practices, in particular the clearing of remnants bush fragments to accommodate large-scale irrigation machinery, and the direct impact of fertilizers and irrigation on soil chemistry and mycorrhizae extent and function.

The ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with tea-tree in northern parts of New Zealand require greater survey and characterisation.


Use and Trade


Bibliography


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted