• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • Preliminary Assessed
  • Assessed
  • NTPublished

Hygrocybe coccineocrenata (P.D. Orton) M.M. Moser

Search for another species...

Scientific name
Hygrocybe coccineocrenata
Author
(P.D. Orton) M.M. Moser
Common names
tresavska vlažnica (Serbian: тресавска влажница)
Feinschuppiger Moor-Saftling
wilgotnica czerwona
Mizugoke-no-hana
cretna vlažnica
Veenmosvuurzwammetje
voskovka vroubkovaná
myrvokssopp
Schuppiger Torfmoos-Saftling
Rahkavahakas
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Hygrophoraceae
Assessment status
Published
Assessment date
2019-03-28
IUCN Red List Category
NT
Assessors
Perini, C.
Reviewers
Mueller, G.M., Iršėnaitė, R. & von Bonsdorff, T.

Assessment Notes

The content on this page is fetched from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/147965892/147965981

Justification

Hygrocybe coccineocrenata, a small bright orange-red to red fungus with dark scales on the cap, is associated with peatbogs usually among Sphagnum spp. It can be found also in humid grasslands or areas where small patches of Sphagnum are present such as in forests along streams, open heathlands. In Europe it is more common in northern countries, and becomes rare to very rare in southern countries. The species is rarely reported in North America, Japan, and Korea.

It is endangered by habitat degradation and loss (e.g. habitat conversion, changing hydrology, mining of peat, building recreational facilities), climate change and pollution. Bogs are unique communities that can be destroyed in a matter of days, but require hundreds, if not thousands, of years to form naturally.
Correlated with the loss of habitat, the population size of H. coccineocrenata is suspected to have declined by 25% over the past 50 years. This decline is ongoing and assumed to continue at nearly the same rate.  

It is assessed at NT A2c+3c+4c

Taxonomic notes

Recent molecular systematic studies indicate that this species may be a complex, leading to miss-identifications, unpublished data. 

Geographic range

This species is found in peatlands of the northern hemisphere: Europe, North America and Asia. The centre of its distribution is in Scandinavia.

Population and Trends

Recent molecular taxonomic data documented that this species is restricted in Finland to the southern part where is has been reported from < 10 localities (Höijer pers comm). Swedish and Norwegian material has not yet been examined, but a similar situation probably exists in these countries, greatly reducing the number of known localities. Elsewhere in Europe it is occasionally reported from subarctic and hemiboreal zones, rarely in temperate areas, and very rarely in the south of Europe. It is declining in central and southern Europe, e.g., VU Poland, Denmark, Austria, Netherlands,  EN Switzerland, CR Croatia,  EX Serbia). In Italy, the small relict areas with Sphagnum of Abetone (northern Apennines) have been investigated since the end of the 1990s; in two of the ten sites it is extinct (in 2007 and 2010 respectively), and in one site a decline in fruiting was observed. In Russia, it is reported from at least 9 regions in the taiga zone. It is included in the Red Data Book for St. Petersburg City. The species is rarely reported in North America (Mycoportal, MushroomObserver, iNaturalist, GBiF),  Japan, and Korea (GBiF).

The decline in species population size is correlated with a decline in its specific habitat area and quality. The species grows in bogs and humid Pinus forests, usually among Sphagnum, along with orchids and insectivorous species of conservation interest. It is assumed that the decline in peatbogs has been > 30% over the past 50 years (Joosten 2009). This decline is ongoing and expected to continue. This has resulted in an estimated decline in population size of H. coccineocrenata of 25%.  As the habitat will continue to decline in the future, so will the population size of H. coccineocrenata.

Population Trend: decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Hygrocybe coccineocrenata can be observed in bogs and humid Pinus forests, usually among Sphagnum, or on dried out oligotrophic lake shores. It can also be found in humid grasslands or areas where small patches of Sphagnum are present such as in forests along streams and open heathlands. These habitats are listed in the EU project “Natura 2000” as worthy of protection due to "unfavourable bad" conservation status: Sphagnum and acid bogs (code 7100) and Aapa mires (code 7320). The species has rarely been reported from North American and habitat requirements are assumed to be similar to those in Europe. 

From northern Europe towards the Mediterranean, these areas gradually become smaller, less widespread and restricted to montane areas on siliceous rocks. At the southern limit of their distribution, these habitats hosting arctic-alpine plants can be seen as glacial relicts. 

Fruiting of this species occurs from summer to autumn.

It is endangered by habitat degradation and loss (e.g. habitat conversion, changing hydrology, mining of peat, building recreational facilities), climate change and pollution. Bogs are unique communities that can be destroyed in a matter of days, but require hundreds, if not thousands, of years to form naturally.

Threats

H. coccineocrenata is usually associated with peat bogs which are threatened by habitat degradation and loss (e.g. habitat conversion, changing hydrology, pollution and nutrient loads, mining of peat, building recreational facilities), and climate change driving increased drought conditions (Joosten 2009)

Conservation Actions

The species can be protected through the conservation of its habitat and preventing the degradation of sites of actual and potential occurrence. This includes, e.g., preventing changes in water regime, avoiding intensification of agriculture and silviculture practices in the neighbouring areas, control over peat extraction, active prevention of the forest succession and erosion, control over the practices leading to eutrophication, etc, and designating key sites for protection. 

Research needed: Inventory studies and monitoring of known sites, molecular taxonomic studies to determine actual species distribution.

Source and Citation

Perini, C. 2019. Hygrocybe coccineocrenata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T147965892A147965981. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-3.RLTS.T147965892A147965981.en .Downloaded on 31 January 2021

Country occurrence