• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • DDPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Leccinum arbuticola Thiers

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Scientific name
Leccinum arbuticola
Author
Thiers
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
DD
Proposed by
Noah Siegel
Assessors
Noah Siegel
Comments etc.
James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Leccinum arbuticola is a bolete which grows with Madrone and Manzanita. Most records come from the Nevada City-Grass Valley area in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California, with other scattered locations in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

Recognizable by the combination of cap color, pale scabers on the stipe when young (darkening in age), blue staining (especially on the stipe), and growth with ericaceous host.

Currently known from 31 collections, from nine locations; all but three of the of the records are over 30 years old. However, this species comes from an area which has been poorly surveyed for fungi in the past 40 years. Efforts should be made to locate this species, and assess trends. Until such time, I recommend listing this species as Data Deficient (DD).


Taxonomic notes

Described based on collections made in Nevada County, California, USA (Thiers 1975).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Leccinum arbuticola is a bolete which grows with Madrone and Manzanita. Most records come from the Nevada City-Grass Valley area in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California, with other scattered locations in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

Recognizable by the combination of cap color, pale scabers on the stipe when young (darkening in age), blue staining (especially on the stipe), and growth with ericaceous host.

Currently known from 31 collections, from nine locations; all but three of the of the records are over 30 years old. However, this species comes from an area which has been poorly surveyed for fungi in the past 40 years. Efforts should be made to locate this species, and assess trends. Until such time, I recommend listing this species as Data Deficient (DD).


Geographic range

Currently known from California, USA; from the Sierra Nevada foothills, a single record from interior Mendocino County.

Reports from Mexico (Mycoportal 2021) likely represent a distinct species, and are not included in this assessment.


Population and Trends

Currently known from 31 collections, from nine locations; all but three of those records are older than 30 years. However, this may represent a lack of people looking for, and correctly identifying this species.

Habitat dominated by Madrone and Manzanita is widespread, more data are needed to identify the additional factors comprising suitable habitat for this species. The zone this species occurs is subjected to sporadic rainfall, and these areas can go years before receiving adequate rainfall to fruit.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

Ectomycorrhizal with Madrone (Arbutus menziesii) and Manzanita (Arctostaphylos spp.), scattered fruitbodies produced in fall and early winter, typically covered with leaves and debris.

Temperate Forest

Threats

Too little is known regarding this species’ distribution and details of its habitat preferences to properly assess possible threats. Habitat dominated by Manzanita is widespread, more data are needed to identify the additional factors comprising suitable habitat for this species.


Conservation Actions

No specific conservation actions can be identified with regards to this species at this time.


Research needed

Targeted surveys for this species. Better understanding of habitat restraints. Modern taxonomic work on Leccinum in California.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade

Most Leccinum species are edible; and being difficult to identify past genus level, many are indiscriminately eaten.

Food - human

Bibliography

MyCoPortal. 2021. Mycology Collections Portal.  Available at: http://mycoportal.org

Siegel, N., Vellinga, E.C., Schwarz, C., Castellano, M.A. and Ikeda, D. 2019. A Field Guide to the Rare Fungi of California’s National Forests. Bookmobile: Minneapolis, MN. 313 p.

Thiers, H.D. 1975. California Mushrooms A Field Guide to the Boletes. Hafner Press.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted