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Cortinarius crypticus (E. Horak) Soop & B. Oertel

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Scientific name
Cortinarius crypticus
Author
(E. Horak) Soop & B. Oertel
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Cortinariaceae
Assessment status
Published
Assessment date
2019-07-26
IUCN Red List Category
DD
Assessors
Cooper, J.A.
Reviewers
Mueller, G.M.

Assessment Notes

The content on this page is fetched from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/154262736/154262747

Justification

The detectability of this species is relatively low and it has probably been overlooked. It has a broad potential range because of the wide-spread mycorrhizal host.  

The apparent limited distribution and population may be due to the potential loss of dispersal vectors (i.e., native animals) resulting in historic and continued decline. 

Sufficient data are lacking to enable estimating its distribution, population size and trends. It is assessed as Data Deficient.

Taxonomic notes

Cortinarius crypticus (previously Gigasperma cryptica) is a relatively white small truffle-like species ectomyorrhizal with southern beech (Nothofagaceaea). It is recognised due to the contrasting marbled gleba, an odour of garlic, and very large spores (to 36um long). The species is sequence barcoded and phylogenetically well characterised. Truffle-like species have been extensively surveyed in New Zealand for over 50 years.

Geographic range

Cortinarius crypticus is a New Zealand endemic species, restricted to alpine South Island. It associates with beech (Nothofagaceae) as an ectomycorrhizal partner. It is known from three collections each from a separate site, recorded between 1968-2004.

Population and Trends

The species is known from three records in three localities over a 50 year period. 

The detectability of this species is relatively low and has it has probably been overlooked. It has a broad potential range because of the wide-spread mycorrhizal host.  

However, the apparent limited distribution and population may be due to the potential loss of dispersal vectors (i.e., native animals) resulting in historic and continued decline. 

Sufficient data are lacking to enable estimating its distribution, population size and trends.

Population Trend: unknown


Habitat and Ecology

This truffle-like species is associated with beech forests (Nothofagaceae). Like many New Zealand truffle species, it is visibly noticeable and grows on the surface of the soil layer. These characters are thought to be adaptations to dispersal by animal vectors (the spores do not naturally disperse). Elsewhere truffles are buried, dull-coloured and dispersed by mammals. In New Zealand, without any native mammals (except two species of bat) the role is thought to be filled by ground-dwelling birds or reptiles, bats, insects (e.g., Weta), and snails, which are either extinct (Moa) or in decline. The role in dispersal by introduced mammals is unknown.

Threats

Historic and continued loss of native spore dispersal animals may be negatively impacting the population. However, the role in dispersal by introduced mammals is unknown.

Conservation Actions

It is likely that the natural dispersal agent for this species is either extinct or in decline and thus the current populations are limited and sensitive to change.

The potential role of replacement dispersal agents (e.g. introduced rats, possums etc) is unknown. The long-term survival of current populations without active dispersal is unknown.

Use and Trade

The species is not utilized.

Source and Citation

Cooper, J.A. 2019. Cortinarius crypticus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T154262736A154262747. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-3.RLTS.T154262736A154262747.en .Downloaded on 31 January 2021

Country occurrence