• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • VUPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Auriporia aurulenta A. David, Tortič & Jelić

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Scientific name
Auriporia aurulenta
Author
A. David, Tortič & Jelić
Common names
pórnatka pomerančová
Duftender Goldporling
Аурипория золотистая
Duftender Goldporling
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Polyporales
Family
Fomitopsidaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
VU C2ai
Proposed by
Sergey Volobuev
Assessors
Susana C. Gonçalves, Izabela L. Kalucka, Armin Mešić, Tatyana Svetasheva, Sergey Volobuev
Editors
Gregory Mueller
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, Jan Merta, Beatrice Senn-Irlet, James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Auriporia aurulenta is a rare lignicolous saprotroph which primarily occurs in mountain old-growth or mature coniferous and mixed coniferous-broadleaved forests. Basidiocarps occur on the wood of large-size coniferous fallen trunks (Pinus, Picea, Abies).
Global red-list assessment: The total number of known localities is around 100-200. As the potential habitat covers a wide area, the number of total sites is estimated at 2000-4000, and the number of mature individuals is estimated to be in between 4,000-8,000 (as usually only one log of the required size and age is found in each locality). The species is restricted to large, mature trees, primarily in montane habitats, and these habitats are in decline. Based on this, the species is assessed as VU according to the C-criterion.

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Taxonomic notes

Auriporia aurulenta A. David, Tortič & Jelić is one of the three species considered currently in the genus Auriporia Ryvarden (Polyporales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota). Two other species are A. aurea (Peck) Ryvarden, the type of the genus Auriporia, and A. brasilica G. Coelho.  Based on ITS data, the one record of this species from the US is conspecific, but the habitat is so different that further study with additional genetic markers is warranted.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Increasing anthropogenic impacts on mountain forest ecosystems, including recreational pressure, logging, and the removal of dead wood, are leading to the destruction of habitats for Auriporia aurulenta, a species with strict requirements for large coniferous dead wood in mountain habitats.


Geographic range

The species is known from several countries in Europe (Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Russia (European part), Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine), and Asia (China, India, Russia (Asian part). Usually it is restricted to mountain habitats, everywhere it has been recorded as single specimens.  There is one report from the United States, which is not included in this assessment as the described habitat for that specimen indicates that it may represent a distinct species.

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Population and Trends

Based on available literature and herbarium data, the species has been recorded from single finds within the surveyed localities. The total number of known localities is around 100-200. As the potential habitat covers a wide area, the number of total sites is estimated at 2000-4000. Typically, it is recorded from one log per site. The number of mature individuals (two mature individuals per functional individual, i.e. per trunk or log, c.f. Dahlberg and Mueller 2011) is estimated to be in between 4,000-8,000 mature individual (as usually only one log of the required size and age is found in each locality).  The species is restricted to large, mature trees, primarily in montane habitats, and these habitats are in decline.

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Auriporia aurulenta is a lignicolous saprotroph. The species primarily occurs in mountain old-growth or mature coniferous and mixed coniferous-broadleaved forests. Basidiocarps occur on the wood of large-size coniferous fallen trunks (Pinus, Picea, Abies).

Boreal ForestTemperate Forest

Threats

As the species needs large dead conifer trunks, logging, removal of dead wood, etc. reduces its required substrata and habitat. Logging of these forests and conversion for recreational development of mountain areas are key drivers of habitat loss.

Potential referens EU Jansen et al 2016, search for habitat development.

Tourism & recreation areasUnintentional effects: subsistence/small scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Unintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Recreational activities

Conservation Actions

Site and habitat protection with appropriate management is needed.

Site/area protectionResource & habitat protectionSub-national level

Research needed

Research into the distribution and habitat requirement of the species throughout its range is needed. Based on ITS data, the one record of this species from the US is conspecific, but the habitat is so different that further study with additional genetic markers is warranted.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

none


Bibliography

Bondartseva M.A. 1998. Families Albatrellaceae, Aporpiaceae, Boletopsidaceae, Bondarzewiaceae, Corticiaceae (species with poroid hymenophore), Fistulinaceae, Ganodermataceae, Lachnocladiaceae (species with tubular hymenophore), Phaeolaceae, Polyporaceae (genera with tubular hymenophore), Poriaceae, Rigidoporaceae. Nauka, St. Petersburg. 391 p. (Key-book of fungi of Russia. Order Aphyllophorales. Vol. 2).
Ghobad-Nejhad M., Hallenberg N., Parmasto E., Kotiranta H. 2009. A first annotated checklist of corticioid and polypore basidiomycetes of the Caucasus Region. Mycologia Balcanica, 6: 123–168.
Kotiranta H., Ushakova N., Mukhin V.A. 2007. Polypore (Aphyllophorales, Basidiomycetes) studies in Russia. 2. Central Ural. Annales Botanici Fennici, 44(2): 103–127.
Ryvarden L., Melo I. 2017. Poroid fungi of Europe. 2nd edition. Oslo: Fungiflora. 432 p. (Synopsis Fungorum. Vol. 37).
Stavishenko I.V. 2018. Distribution and new record of rare species Auriporia aurulenta (Fomitopsidaceae, Polyporales) in the Urals. Mikologiya i fitopatologiya, 52(6): 420–423.
Volobuev S.V., Ivanushenko Yu.Yu., Ismailov A.B. 2019. Auriporia aurulenta – a proposal to the Red Data Book of the Republic of Dagestan. Proceedings of the International Conference “Flora and nature conservation in the Caucasus: history and current state of study”. Pyatigorsk: 32-33.
Wang B., Cui B.-K., Li H.-J., Du P., Jia B.-S. 2011. Wood-rotting fungi in eastern China. 5. Polypore diversity in Jiangxi Province. Annales Botanici Fennici, 48(3): 237–246.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted