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Cantharellus subalbidus A.H. Sm. & Morse

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Scientific name
Cantharellus subalbidus
Author
A.H. Sm. & Morse
Common names
White Chanterelle
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Cantharellales
Family
Cantharellaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
LC
Proposed by
Noah Siegel
Assessors
Noah Siegel
Comments etc.
James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Cantharellus subalbidus is a common chanterelle in northern California, and the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Being a highly prized edible species, it is sought after by many mushroom hunters and foragers. No decline has been observed due to harvesting, and overall population appears stable.

This species should be listed as Least Concern (LC)


Taxonomic notes

Cantharellus subalbidus was described from western North America (Smith and Morse 1947).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Cantharellus subalbidus is a common chanterelle in northern California, and the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Being a highly prized edible species, it is sought after by many mushroom hunters and foragers. No decline has been observed due to harvesting, and overall population appears stable.

This species should be listed as Least Concern (LC)


Geographic range

From Santa Cruz County, California north along the coast and Coast Range, and from the southern Sierra Nevada mountains north; occurring throughout the Pacific Northwest, east into the Rocky Mountains, north into the Canadian Rockies.


Population and Trends

Population is widespread in multiple habitat types; from coastal evergreen forests or Sierra Mixed Conifer forests in California, and across the conifer forests in the Pacific Northwest. No decline of this species has been noted.

Population Trend: Stable


Habitat and Ecology

Ectomycorrhizal with conifers across the Pacific Northwest; especially Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). More variable with habitat association in California; with both conifers and hardwoods (Madrone, Arbutus menziesii; Tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus; Manzanita, Arctostaphylos spp;). It appears to have a preference for, but it is not restricted to, mature forests in the Pacific Northwest. Occurring in coastal, Coast Range, lowland and montane forests across it’s range.

Temperate Forest

Threats

No specific threats have been identified with regards to this species.


Conservation Actions

This species was included on the US Forest Service Northwest Forest Plan species of special concern (Castellano et al. 2003). No specific research is currently needed in regards to this species.


Research needed

No specific research is currently needed in regards to this species.


Use and Trade

Cantharellus subalbidus is a highly prized edible species, and is commonly collected, and even occasionally commercially harvested across its range.

Food - human

Bibliography

Arora, D. 1986. Mushrooms Demystified. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, CA. 959 p.

Castellano, M.A., Cázares, E., Fondrick, B. and Dreisbach, T. 2003. Handbook to additional fungal species of special concern in the Northwest Forest Plan (Gen. Tech Rep. PNW-GTR-572). U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: Portland, OR. 144 p.

Siegel, N. & Schwarz, C. 2016. Mushrooms of the Redwood Coast. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, CA. 601 p.

Smith, A.H. and Morse, E.E. 1947. The genus Cantharellus in the western United States. Mycologia 39(5): 497-534.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted