• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
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Mycena quiniaultensis Kauffman

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Scientific name
Mycena quiniaultensis
Author
Kauffman
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Mycenaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
Noah Siegel
Assessors
Noah Siegel
Comments etc.
James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Mycena quiniaultensis is an uncommon Mycena with a viscid, translucent-striate gray cap, white gills, and a viscid gray stipe.
The size (larger than many Mycena), and viscid nature of the fruit bodies make this species recognizable in the field or from photographs (unlike many other gray Mycena).

Currently known from ~100 collections from 50+ locations, and appears to have a preference for mature and old growth forests, but is not limited to these habitats.

Based on the fact it is a general litter decayer, and considering the widespread distribution and number of collections, it appears to be Least Concern (LC).


Taxonomic notes

Describe from Lake Quinault on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, USA (Smith 1935).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Mycena quiniaultensis is an uncommon Mycena with a viscid, translucent-striate gray cap, white gills, and a viscid gray stipe.
The size (larger than many Mycena), and viscid nature of the fruit bodies make this species recognizable in the field or from photographs (unlike many other gray Mycena).

Currently known from ~100 collections from 50+ locations, and appears to have a preference for mature and old growth forests, but is not limited to these habitats.

Based on the fact it is a general litter decayer, and considering the widespread distribution and number of collections, it appears to be Least Concern (LC).


Geographic range

Known from coastal forests from Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada south to Santa Cruz, County, California, USA, and in the Cascade Range in Washington and Oregon, and the SIskiyou Range in southern Oregon and northern California.


Population and Trends

Currently known from ~100 collections from 50+ locations, and likely under reported. It still should be considered an uncommon mushroom, and it appears to have a preference for mature and old growth forests, but is not limited to these habitats. Data to fully asses trends is lacking. There are a number of recent observations on iNaturalist (2021). With these recent observations, knowledge about range and habitat restraints of this species has greatly expanded.

Population Trend: Stable


Habitat and Ecology

Saprotrophic on needle duff, debris and moss under conifers; especially Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) in California, and wet conifer forests in the Pacific Northwest. It appears to have a preference for, but is not limited to mature and old growth forests.

Temperate Forest

Threats

Continued loss of mature and old growth forests, due to logging and stand replacing fires.

Unintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Increase in fire frequency/intensity

Conservation Actions

This species is included on the United States Forest Service Northwest Forest Plan Survey and Manage list of rare/old growth forests dependent fungi, and has been actively surveyed for since the late 1990’s. (Castellano et al. 1999).

Stop logging old growth forests and limit clear cutting practices.


Research needed

A better understanding of range of this species, and habitat restraints.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

None known.


Bibliography

Castellano, M.A., Smith, J.E., O’Dell, T., Cázares, E. and Nugent, S. 1999. Handbook to Strategy 1 Fungal Species in the Northwest Forest Plan. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: Portland, OR. 195 p.

iNaturalist. 2021. Available at http://www.inaturalist.org

MyCoPortal. 2021. http://mycoportal.org/portal/index.php. Accessed on February 24.

Smith, A.H. 1935. Studies in the genus Mycena - II. Mycologia 27: 586-604.

Smith, A.H. 1947. North American Species of Mycena. University of Michigan Press: Ann Arbor, MI. 521 p.


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted