• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • VUPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Boletellus jalapensis (Murrill) E.-J. Gilbert

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Scientific name
Boletellus jalapensis
Author
(Murrill) E.-J. Gilbert
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
VU C1
Proposed by
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Assessors
Ricardo Garcia-Sandoval
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Gregory Mueller

Assessment Status Notes

This species was described in 1910, is known only from Mexico, and only has been reported from three localities, a suburban area in Veracruz (type locality), a recreational area in Jalisco and a National Park in Chiapas. Despite this species is known since more than 100 years, only has been reported a few times. Halling and Ortiz-Santana (2009) published a monographic paper in Boletellus sec. Ixocephali, and provide confirmation on the identity of the species, and on previous reports of the species (Garcia et al. 1987). Bisides Halling and Ortiz-Santana (2009), only one additional location has been added. Even when the species was collected in Pinus-Quercus forest, and that this is one of the most extended vegetation type in Mexico, is very likely that there are no more localities for the species, because Veracruz and Jalisco are the most studied states in Mexico, and only one locality has been found on each state, and one monographic work for the group confirmed that the other reports were incorrect.

Justification

Considering the number of known localities, and the possibility of existence of other potentially suitable localities, the number of potential individuals can be estimated in 3,000. Considering that models for predicting the effects of climate change have estimate a decline of 68% for the vegetation type over the next 60 years, and the decline of the Quercus species that inhabit temperate and cold location in 30-45%, it can be considered that Boletellus jalapensis fits the voulnerable category because of criteria C1.


Taxonomic notes

Taxonomy and nomenclature of this species was corroborated in this genus by Singer (1970) and Halling & Ortiz-Santana (2009). Boletellus singeri Gonz.-Velázq. & R. Valenz., also only known from Mexico, is considered a very close species, but so far no phylogenetic information is available.
Basionym
Ceriomyces jalapensis Murrill, Mycologia 2(5): 248 (1910)
Synonym
Boletogaster jalapensis (Murrill) Lohwag, in Handel-Mazzetti, Symb. Sinica 2: 55 (1937)
Current name
Boletellus jalapensis (Murrill) E.-J. Gilbert, Les Livres du Mycologue Tome I-IV, Tom. III: Les Bolets: 107 (1931)

Description from the protologue
Pileus small, convex, circular in outline, 2.2 cm. in diameter, 1 cm thick; surface isabelline to fulvous, slimy, smooth: context white to faintly roseus, mild to the taste, 2 mm. thick behind; hymenium convex, depressed in the form of a crater about the stipe, tubes pale-greenish, 7 mm. long, mouths large, rounded, 1–2 to a mm., edges thin; spores ellipsoid, deep- ferruginous, distinctly longitudinally striate, copious, 13–15×7–9 μ: stipe central, slender, tapering upward, concolorous, smooth, glabrous, not conspicuously slimy like the cap, swollen and white at the base, 6 cm. long, 4 mm. thick at the middle.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

This species was described by William A. Murrill in 1910 as Ceriomyces jalapensis, typified with one specimen collected in what was then a virgin forest in Xalapa. Since then it has been collected from another two localities, one in the state of Chiapas and another in the state of Jalisco. All the three localities are urban or suburban, but the one in Chiapas is located in the vicinity of a National Park. The three localities are separated by hundreds of kilometers, so the known distribution of this species is very scattered. Due to current policies in land use on the areas were this species inhabit, and the scattered nature of its distribution, the species populations are in decline.


Geographic range

This species is know from three localities: a virgin forest in the vicinities of the city of Xalapa, Veracruz, 1900 (Murrill 1910); Balneario Cañon de las Flores, a public aquatic park near the Bosque de la Primavera, a protected area, 1980 (Halling & Ortiz-Santana (2009); and in the Parque Nacional Lagunas de Montebello, Chiapas in 2004 and 2005 (GBIF 2018).


Population and Trends

Boletellus jalapensis is only known from Mexico, this species was reported from three localities, one is the type locality near Jalapa, Veracruz, locality was described as virgin forest in the original protologue, but according with CONABIO database (http://www.conabio.gob.mx) nowadays the locality is surrounded with patches of tropical mountain cloud forest. Second,  a recent locality in Jalisco, with Pinus-Quercus forest, located in a recreational area near “Bosque de la Primavera”. Third, in Lagunas de Montebello, Chiapas, this locality is a tropical montane cloud forest, according to the vegetation map from INEGI (2013).

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

Boletellus jalapensis is only known from Mexico, this species was reported from three localities, one is the type locality near Jalapa, Veracruz, locality was described as virgin forest in the original protologue, but according to the CONABIO database (http://www.conabio.gob.mx) nowadays the locality is surrounded with patches of tropical mountain cloud forest. Second, a recent locality in Jalisco, with Pinus-Quercus forest, located in a recreational area near “Bosque de la Primavera”. Third, in Lagunas de Montebello, Chiapas, this locality has a tropical montane cloud forest, according to the vegetation map from INEGI (2013).  Each of the localities from where it has been collected are hundreds of kilometers away, and usually one individual is collected per locality.


Threats

Main threats for this species are related with the decline tendencies of the vegetation type where the species inhabit. This species is only known from tropical montane cloud forest (TMC) habitats, and Pinus-Quercus forest. TMC forests are estimated to decline 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).  Even when Pinus-Quercus forest is one of the most extended vegetation types in the country (Rzedowski 2006), deforestation trends are very high in Mexico (Rosete-Verges et al. 2014), and because of climate change Quercus species that inhabit temperate and montane locations are estimated to decline by 30-45% over the next 30 years (Gómez-Mendoza and Arriaga 2007).


Conservation Actions

Conservation actions for this species are related with the conservation of their habitat, and may include conventional programs for the conservation of the forest, and or management of the forest.


Research needed

Additional research needed for this species may include additional records for its distribution, as well as a molecular characterization, producing DNA sequences for barcoding markers, and markers for phylogenetic and macroevolutionary research. Also more information is needed regarding ecological need for this species, specially regarding ectomycorrhizal association.

TaxonomyLife history & ecologyConservation PlanningHabitat trends

Use and Trade

The are no uses or trade information for this species.


Bibliography

González-Velázquez A, Valenzuela R (1995) A new species of Boletellus (Basidiomycotina, Agaricales: Boletaceae) from Mex- ico. Mycotaxon 55:399–404
INEGI, (12/12/2013). ‘Conjunto de datos vectoriales de uso de suelo y vegetación escala 1:250 000, serie V (capa unión)’, escala: 1:250000. edición: 2a. Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía. Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes.

Halling, R. E., & Ortiz-Santana, B. (2009). A revision of Boletellus sect. Ixocephali. Mycological progress, 8(3), 237.

Ponce-Reyes, R., Reynoso-Rosales, V. H., Watson, J. E., VanDerWal, J., Fuller, R. A., Pressey, R. L., & Possingham, H. P. (2012). Vulnerability of cloud forest reserves in Mexico to climate change. Nature Climate Change, 2(6), 448.

Rzedowski, J. (2006). Vegetación de México. 1ra. Edición digital, Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad, México, 504.

Singer R (1970) Strobilomycetaceae (Basidiomycetes). Fl Neotrop Monogr 5:1–34


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted