• Proposed
  • 2Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Xylaria hypoxylon (L.) Grev.

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Scientific name
Xylaria hypoxylon
Author
(L.) Grev.
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Unknown
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Sordariomycetes
Order
Xylariales
Family
Xylariaceae
Assessment status
Proposed
Proposed by
LAYANNE FERRO
Comments etc.
LAYANNE FERRO

Assessment Notes

Taxonomic notes

Xylaria hypoxylon is extremely variable in appearance, featuring a fruiting body that can be narrowly cylindric and pointed, or cylindric below but branched and flattened above, somewhat reminiscent of tiny moose antlers. Both fruiting body types (along with variations) regularly appear together in the same place. The upper portion is initially powdery and whitish, but eventually becomes hardened, black, and pimply, representing the transition from anamorph to teleomorph. In both stages, and regardless of the overall shape of the fruiting body, the apex is usually attenuated and sterile (not covered with whitish powder or, later, not pimply).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

The species make up several ecosystems, which are under threat. I suggest including it in the list of least concern (LC).


Geographic range

According to GBIF the species has 32791 occurrences, distributed worldwide.


Population and Trends

Species widely distributed worldwide, with greater concentration in United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland

Population Trend:


Habitat and Ecology

Saprobic on the deadwood of hardwoods; growing gregariously to densely gregariously; spring through fall; by strict definitions distributed in Europe and the West Coast of the United States, but (mis)reported as widely distributed in North America from Canada through Mexico—and in Central America, the Caribbean, South America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Despite being widely distributed in the world, X. hypoxylon is associated with environments with high degradation of soil, wood and vegetation.


Threats

Despite being widely distributed in the world, X. hypoxylon is associated with environments with high degradation of soil, wood and vegetation.


Conservation Actions

The species is not strongly threatened, but needs conservation actions as it is part of important ecosystems for the world.


Research needed

he genus Xylaria presents many complexes that are not well defined, taxonomic and phylogenetic studies are needed to better define their species.


Use and Trade

Production of compounds for industry.

Manufacturing chemicals

Bibliography


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted