• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • NTPreliminary Assessed
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Boletus dupainii Boud.

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Scientific name
Boletus dupainii
Author
Boud.
Common names
hríb Dupainov
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Boletaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT OK A2cd+A3cd+C2a(i)
Proposed by
Claudia Perini
Assessors
Susana C. Gonçalves
Editors
Ivona Kautmanova
Contributors
João Baptista-Ferreira, Tommy Knutsson, Michael Krikorev, Vladimír Kunca, Claudia Perini, Tatyana Svetasheva
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Thomas Læssøe, Ibai Olariaga Ibarguren

Assessment Status Notes

Susana: Note that Ivona Kautmanova started to assess this species 2015. I now out her as an editor and it coud be that you both will be the final editors. //Anders Jan 16th 2018

Justification

Boletus dupainii is an ectomycorrhizal species associated with trees in the Fagaceae, typically Quercus. It is widespread in central-southern Europe and also reported from the Russian Caucasus, Turkey and Israel. The species has shown a decline in some countries and it is red-listed in most countries of occurrence. The conservation status of its most common habitat is reported as “unfavourable-inadequate” based on future prospects. Major threats relate to forest management and forest exploitation.
Red-listed as near threatened under criteria A2c+A3c, because of past and future estimated habitat decline ca. 20 % in a 50-year period. Also under criteria C2a(i); the number of mature individuals is expected to be 20 000, with no subpopulation larger than 1000.


Taxonomic notes

The taxon current names include Suillellus dupainii and Rubroboletus dupainii, with Boletus dupainii as basionym.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Boletus dupainii is an ectomycorrhizal species associated with trees in the Fagaceac, typically Quercus. It is widespread in central-southern Europe and also reported from the Russian Caucasus, Turkey and Israel. The species has shown a decline in some countries and it is red-listed in most countries of occurrence. The conservation status of its most common habitat is reported as “unfavourable-inadequate” based on future prospects. Major threats relate to forest management and forest exploitation.
Red-listed as near threatened under criteria A2c+A3c, because of past and future estimated habitat decline ca. 20 % in a 50-year period. Also under criteria C2a(i); the number of mature individuals is expected to be 20 000, with no subpopulation larger than 1000.


Geographic range

Widespread in central-southern Europe (absent from the UK and Scandinavia); also reported from the Russian Caucasus, Turkey and Israel.


Population and Trends

Overall rare, though more abundant in Southern European countries (France, Slovenia). By 2015, the number of known sites was reported to be around 100 (expected 1000) (Fraiture & Otto, 2015), and declining due to threatened habitat (European Commission, 2015).

The mid-term review of the EU biodiversity strategy towards to 2020 (European Commission, 2015) indicates a “decrease in habitat change” in woodland ecosystems as the future trend, but also specifies that the vast majority of assessments of conservation status for woodlands remains “unfavourable” (80 %). The majority of the assessments of conservation status for woodland
 and forest species from the Habitats Directive
 are “unfavourable”, with 44% assessed as “unfavourable-inadequate” and 16% assessed as “unfavourable-bad”. As for the trends in conservation status of (target) species, nearly a quarter of the assessments are assessed as “unfavourable-stable” (22%), while only 6% are assessed as “unfavourable-improving”; a significant amount of the remaining assessments (17%) are assessed as “unfavourable-declining” (European Environmental Agency, 2015).

The most common habitat of the species is “Medio-European limestone beech forests of the Cephalanthero-Fagion” (Natura 2000 code 9150, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia). According to the last report under Article 17 of the EU Habitats Directive (European Environmental Agency, 2007-2012) the conservation status of this habitat is “unfavourable-inadequate” and in all regions except Mediterranean, “unfavourable-bad” and Pannonian “favourable”. Range and area are “favourable” in all regions and both structure & functions and future prospects are the reason for the “unfavourable” assessments.

By 2015, the number of known sites was reported to be around 100, of which more than 50 in France in Italy (Fraiture & Otto, 2015).
GBIF - 128 occurrences under Suillellus dupainii

Population Trend: Deteriorating


Habitat and Ecology

The species mainly occurs in termophilous deciduous natural or semi-natural forests dominated by Quercus, often old-growth, sometimes preferring more open areas. It is ectomycorrhizal with trees in the Fagaceae, typically Quercus (e.g. Q. cerris, petraea, pubescens, suber, ilex, rotundifolia), but also Carpinus, Fagus and Castanea.

Often accompanied by other Boletales species (B. fechtneri, B. lupinus, B. rhodoxanthus). Due to global warming effect probably slowly spreading northwards, finding suitable habitats in oak and beech forests of Central Europe.

In Europe, the species occurs in the following Natura 2000 habitats (codes): 9150 (“Medio-European limestone beech forests of the Cephalanthero-Fagion”; the most common habitat), 9160, 9170, 91G0, 91H0, 91M0, 91AA, 9330, 9340.

Temperate Forest

Threats

The two most frequently reported threats relate to forest management and use, and forest exploitation (e.g., fire, clearcutting). In some cases, a decline of habitat may be irreversible due to the substitution of native oak forests by conifers (e.g. Pinus nigra) and spreading of the invasive alien species Robinia pseudoacacia.

Agro-industry plantationsRenewable energyUnintentional effects: large scale (species being assessed is not the target) [harvest]Fire & fire suppressionNamed speciesNutrient loads

Conservation Actions

The species is red-listed or protected by law in most of the countries where it occurs. For the sites that are within the Natura 2000 network, appropriate forest management plans can play a role in increasing the conservation status of the species. For the localities located outside protected the Natura 2000 network, improving EU-level information on forest status will allow a more precise assessment of the situation and the design of appropriate policy responses.

Site/area protectionSite/area managementInvasive/problematic species control

Research needed

Records in North and Central America need confirmation for conspecificity. There are two sequences (ITS) of Rubroboletus dupainii, the European Boletus dupainii, and sequences from North America (tef1). However, because different loci were used comparisons aren’t possible.

Taxonomy

Use and Trade


Bibliography

Dahlberg A. & Croneborg H. 2006. The 33 threatened fungi in Europe. Nature and environment, No. 136. Council of Europe Publishing. ISBN-10: 92-871-5928-9; ISBN-13: 978-92-871-5928-1

European Commission. 2015. The mid-term review of the EU biodiversity strategy to 2020. Report from the Commission to the European parliament and the Council. Brussels. (summary at http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/biodiversity/comm2006/pdf/mid_term_review_summary.pdf)

European Environmental Agency. 2007-2012. 9150 Medio-European limestone beech forests of the Cephalanthero-Fagion. Report under the Article 17 of the Habitats Directive European Environment Period 2007-2012. Accessed on February 2018 at https://bd.eionet.europa.eu

Fraiture A. & Otto P. (eds) 2015. Distribution, ecology and status of 51 macromycetes in Europe. Results of the ECCF Mapping Programme. Scripta Botanica Belgica 53, Botanic Garden Meise.

GBIF website at https://www.gbif.org/ Accessed 20 February 2018.
https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/search?taxon_key=7747405


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted