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Amanita herrerae Aroche

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Scientific name
Amanita herrerae
Author
Aroche
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Amanitaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
EN A3c
Proposed by
Eduardo Perez Pazos
Assessors
Roberto Garibay Orijel, Eduardo Perez Pazos
Editors
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg

Assessment Notes

Amanita herrerae was reported for the first time in Mexico (Aroche 1986) and collected twice from the same Mountain Cloud Forest location. Since then there have been any more records. Extensive collections of the genus Amanita have been done by Pérez-Silva and Guzman in Mexico; because of this, it is unlikely that its known distribution is due to under-sampling.
This species should be protected because of its rarity and limited distribution to an endangered vegetation type (Mountain Cloud Forest)

Justification

According with current climate change models, mountain cloud forest in Mexico will suffer a reduction of 68% in the following 60 years. In consequence, this species should be listed as Endangered under criteria A3c, because it is projected a reduction in the EOO and quality of habitat of more than 50% in the next 50 years (three generations).


Taxonomic notes

Amanita herrerae is assigned to Section Amidellae (Aroche 1986) subgenus Lepidella due to its amyloid spores, although Tulloss (2019) suggests it belongs to Section Phalloideae. It has a bulbous stipe and adhering sac volva which turns yellow by handling. Lacking clamps. White to a marble-alabaster colored cap, center grayish-brown, with yellowish-brown tones, with the margin slightly appendiculate.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Amanita herrerae was reported for the first time in Mexico (Aroche 1986) and collected twice from the same Mountain Cloud Forest location. Since then there have been any more records. Extensive collections of the genus Amanita have been done by Pérez-Silva and Guzman in Mexico; because of this, it is unlikely that its known distribution is due to under-sampling.
This species should be protected because of its rarity and limited distribution to an endangered vegetation type. According with current climate change models, mountain cloud forest in Mexico will suffer a reduction of 68% in the following 60 years. In consequence, this species should be listed as Endangered under criteria A3c, because it is projected a reduction in the EOO and quality of habitat of more than 50% in the next 50 years (three generations).


Geographic range

Amanita herrerae is only known from Mexico in the type locality, in mountain cloud forests, where it was collected in 1983-1986 (Aroche 1986).


Population and Trends

There are no occurrences registered in GBIF (GBIF secretariat 2017). Amanita herrerae is only known from the type locality, alongside Pachuca-Tampico Highway 105 (Km 161), Tlanchinol, Hidalgo, where it was collected twice during 1983-1986. Extensive collections of the genus Amanita have been done by Pérez-Silva and Guzman in Mexico; because of this, it is unlikely that its known distribution is due to subsampling.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

Solitary, sub-gregarious; growing on humus and soil, under Quercus sp., in mountain cloud forests (1500 masl). Only known from its type locality.

Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

The only records of Amanita herrerae come from a highly urbanized area which originally was covered by a mountain cloud forest. One possible threat is the edge effect that may limit its dispersion and growth (if there is any population yet). The urban pressure is the main concern over its only known population. Additionaly, Mountain cloud forests represents less than 1% of the forest area in Mexico, and is severely fragmented, it has been predicted a reduction of 68% of the mountain cloud fores in Mexico in the next 50 years due to climate change (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).

Housing & urban areasShifting agricultureSmall-holder grazing, ranching or farming

Conservation Actions

By now, the type locality is out of any National Park or similar conservation area. Amanita herrerae is not listed in any national or international Redlist.


Research needed

To perform phylogenetic analysis using the type specimen available to elucidate the species relationships with other species of the genus and possibly found new occurrences. Furthermore, an increase in sampling effort to locate (if there exists any) some other populations of the species, particularly in mountain cloud forests.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade

There are not reports about edibility or use of these species. Aroche (1986) discarded the presence of either amanotoxins or phalotoxins in A. herrerae, although Tulloss (2019) mentions that it should be considered deadly poisonous.

Poisons

Bibliography

Amanita herrerae Aroche in GBIF Secretariat (2017). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset [https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei]. Accessed via GBIF.org on April 23, 2019.
Aroche RM (1986) A new species of Amanita. Revista Mexicana de Micología 2: 335-342.
Leija-Loredo EG, Pavón NP, Sánchez-González A, Rodriguez-Laguna R, & Ángeles-Pérez G (2018) Land cover change and carbon stores in a tropical montane cloud forest in the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico. Journal of Mountain Science, 15: 2136-2147.
Mycoportal (2019) [http://mycoportal.org/portal/collections/individual/index.php?occid=4637850]. Accessed April 23, 2019.
Tulloss RE (2019) Amanita herrerae. in Tulloss RE, Yang ZL, (eds) Amanitaceae studies.  [http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita+herrerae]. Accessed April 23, 2019.
Ponce-Reyes, R., Nicholson, E., Baxter, P. W. J., Fuller, R. A. and Possingham, H. (2013). Extinction risk in cloud forest fragments under climate change and habitat loss. Diversity and Distributions 19, 518–529.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted