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Mitrulinia ushuaiae (Rehm) Spooner

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Scientific name
Mitrulinia ushuaiae
Author
(Rehm) Spooner
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Cup-fungi, Truffles and Allies
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Leotiomycetes
Order
Helotiales
Family
Sclerotiniaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
Peter Buchanan
Assessors
Peter Buchanan
Editors
Tom May
Contributors
Peter Buchanan
Comments etc.
Jerry Cooper
Reviewers
Anders Dahlberg, Gregory Mueller

Assessment Notes

Taxonomic notes

Mitrulinia ushuaiae was described from South America. New Zealand material so-identified is considered to be a different species within Mitruliana (fide Peter Johnston). DNA sequences from a NZ specimen suggest that this fungus is phylogenetically isolated in the Leotiomycetes. But there is a South American Leotiomycete sequence (KY462418) that is very close and likely to be Mitrulinia ushuaiae, but probably not the same species as NZ specimens.

The NZ species is macroscopically distinctive, and the few collections indicate that, although widespread, it is not common.  It has not been collected personally by ascomycete specialist Peter Johnston in over 4 decades of collecting.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

NZ endemic. 5 collections from 2 geographically separate areas in the South Is., New Zealand.  Quite spectacular because of yellow colour and size. Rarely collected but possibly widespread at least in the South Island.  Considered a separate unnamed species of Mitrulinia, separate from M. ushuaiae


Geographic range

Known from Nothofagus forest from Craigieburn Forest Park, mid-Canterbury (3 specimens) and vic. Glenorchy, Otago Lakes (2 specimens).


Population and Trends

Despite its conspicuous appearance, the species has not yet been collected personally by Peter Johnston (ascomycete specialist) in over 4 decades of his collecting.

Population Trend:


Habitat and Ecology

Saprobic on wood of native beech, especially Fuscospora cliffortioides and F. solandri.


Threats

Recorded locations are in protected forests, with host species widespread. Climate disruption could be considered the major threat, until more is known about reasons for its apparently disjunct distribution.


Conservation Actions

None


Research needed

Further phylogenetic studies to differentiate relationships among Southern Hemisphere specimens, likely representing two distinct species.


Use and Trade

None


Bibliography

Spooner, B.M. 1987: Helotiales of Australasia: Geoglossaceae, Orbiliaceae, Sclerotiniaceae, Hyaloscyphaceae.116 ed. Bibliotheca Mycologica;

Gamundí, I.J. 1977: Subantarctic Geoglossaceae: I. Kew Bulletin 31: 731-739


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted