• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Caloplaca luteoalba (Turner) Th. Fr.

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Scientific name
Caloplaca luteoalba
Author
(Turner) Th. Fr.
Common names
orange-fruited elm lichen
iepenzonnetje
IUCN Specialist Group
Lichens
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Lecanoromycetes
Order
Teloschistales
Family
Teloschistaceae
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
David Minter
Assessors
David Minter
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg

Assessment Status Notes

Taxonomic notes

This species has recently been redisposed to the genus Cerothallia as Cerothallia luteoalba (Turner) Arup, Frödén & Søchting, Nordic Journal of Botany 31 (1): 40 (2013). [IndexFungorum LSID 802037; Teloschistaceae, Teloschistales].


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

There is some evidence that C. luteoalba is affected by climate change (GIORDANI & INCERTI, 2008). Following decline in populations in the 1960s and 1970s through sulphur dioxide air pollution, death of mature elm trees as a result of Dutch elm disease has meant a significant loss of habitat for this species (WATSON ET AL., 1988). In the UK removal of hedgerows and their associated trees in the 1970s and 1980s also meant a significant loss of habitat for this fungus [www.plantlife.org.uk/uploads/documents/management-guide-Lichens-and-elm-trees.pdf]. Using IUCN categories and criteria, Minter & Cannon (2013) evaluated this species globally as Near Threatened.


Geographic range

AFRICA: Morocco, South Africa. ASIA. Iran, Israel, Syria. ATLANTIC OCEAN. Portugal (Azores). AUSTRALASIA. Australia (Western Australia). EUROPE: Austria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, Ukraine. NORTH AMERICA: USA (Colorado, Washington). A native of temperate Europe, North America and western Asia; said to be native to Western Australia [http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/27637], status elsewhere unclear. Records up to 150 m above sea level, but doubtless occurs higher.


Population and Trends

There is some evidence that C. luteoalba is affected by climate change (GIORDANI & INCERTI, 2008). Following decline in populations in the 1960s and 1970s through sulphur dioxide air pollution, death of mature elm trees as a result of Dutch elm disease has meant a significant loss of habitat for this species (WATSON ET AL., 1988).

Population Trend:


Habitat and Ecology

Associated organisms as follows. Fungi. Bacidia incompta (Borrer) Anzi; Caloplaca phlogina (Ach.) Flagey. Plantae. Acer pseudoplatanus L.; A. campestre L.; Aesculus hippocastanum L. (bark); Fraxinus excelsior L.; Plantae indet. (bark); Quercus macranthera Fisch. & C.A. Mey. ex Hohen. (bark); Ulmus sp. (bark). Other substrata. Rock. Photobionts. Trebouxioid green algae. A lichen-forming fungus growing on well-lit, sunny trunks of trees with alkaline bark, particularly Ulmus spp. It may be found on the bark or on exposed lignum, usually towards the base of the trunk where the bark or wood is nutrient-enriched from sap exuding from wounds, or impregnated by dung-enriched dust. Wayside trees are an important habitat because there is more light than in a forest environment, and dung and dust particles from the nearby road enrich their nutrient status (EDWARDS, 2002) although, on the basis of its distribution and overall rarity, the present species may be sensitive to nitrogen pollution. Associated trees have been observed in domestic gardens, parkland, scrub, urban and industrial areas, farmland, and mixed woodland. Cerothalia luteoalba is often found on veteran trees, particularly those with hollow trunks, and may be an indicator of old-growth (EDWARDS, 2002). Before the advent of Dutch Elm disease, elm was its favoured associated tree but more recently it has been found occasionally on ash, field maple and sycamore; more rarely it occurs on calcareous stone or mortar [www.thebls.org.uk/resources/species-accounts/caloplaca-luteoalba]. Nothing is known about interactions with animals. Apart from some information about associations with other lichen-forming fungi, nothing is known about interactions with other fungi.


Threats

There is some evidence that C. luteoalba is affected by climate change (GIORDANI & INCERTI, 2008). Following decline in populations in the 1960s and 1970s through sulphur dioxide air pollution, death of mature elm trees as a result of Dutch elm disease has meant a significant loss of habitat for this species (WATSON ET AL., 1988).


Conservation Actions

In situ conservation actions. None noted. Ex situ conservation actions. No living strains of this species were found in a search of the Culture Collection Information Worldwide on-line catalogue [www.wfcc.info/ccinfo/home]. Three sequences were found in a search of the NCBI, GenBank database [www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov].


Research needed


Bibliography

EDWARDS, B.W. The past and present distribution of Bacidia incompta, Biatoridium monasteriense and Caloplaca luteoalba in England. [Plantlife Back from the Brink Project no. 190]. London: Plantlife (2002). EGEA, J.M. Catalogue of lichenized and lichenicolous fungi of Morocco. Bocconea 6: 19-114 (1996). FRITZ, Ö. Unique lichen flora in avenues at Sperlingsholm, southwestern Sweden. Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift 102 (1): 5-18 (2008). GIORDANI, P. & INCERTI, G. The influence of climate on the distribution of lichens: a case study in a borderline area (Liguria, NW Italy). Plant Ecology 195: 257-272 (2008). MINTER, D.W. & CANNON, P.F. Cerothallia ludeoalba. IMI Descriptions of Fungi and Bacteria No. 1952 (2013). SCHIEFELBEIN, U., BRUYN, U. DE, DOLNIK, C., STOLLEY, G. & NEUMANN, P. New or interesting records of lichen-forming and lichenicolous fungi from northern Germany. Herzogia 23 (1): 85-91 (2010). SEAWARD, M.R.D., SIPMAN, H.J.M., SCHULTZ, M., MAASSOUMI, A.A., MONIRI ANBARAN, M.H. & SOHRABI, M. A preliminary lichen checklist for Iran. Willdenowia 34: 543-576 (2004). WATSON, M.F., HAWKSWORTH, D.L. & ROSE, F. Lichens on elms in the British Isles and the effect of Dutch elm disease on their status. Lichenologist 20 (4): 327-352 (1988). WOODS, R.G. & COPPINS, B.J. A Conservation Evaluation of British Lichens and Lichenicolous Fungi. Species Status [ISSN 1473-0154] 13: 156 pp., Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Peterborough (2012).


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted