• Proposed
  • 2Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Gyroporus phaeocyanescens Singer & M.H. Ivory

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Scientific name
Gyroporus phaeocyanescens
Author
Singer & M.H. Ivory
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Boletales
Family
Gyroporaceae
Assessment status
Proposed
Proposed by
David Lewis
Contributors
Anders Dahlberg, David Lewis

Assessment Status Notes

POTENTIALLY RARE BUT LARGE SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF YET UNKNOWN LOCALITIES WITHIN THIS BROAD RANGE AREA SUGGEST CLASSIFICATION DD.
BUT MAY ALSO HAVE TAXONOMIC UNCERTAINTIES.

5 sites x 10 potential sites x 2 genets x 10 ramets = 1000 (Vulnerable in US) but DD due to uncertainties in Mexico and Belize.

Taxonomic notes

Described by Singer and Ivory from Belize.  It resembles Gyroporus cyanescens but lacks bluing in the tubes.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

It is a rare species known from Florida, Texas, Mexico and Belize.  It was published as new by Singer and Ivory in 1983 from Belize.  Only five collections are listed in Mycoportal.


Geographic range

Holotype collected in Belize in the Augustine Forest Station in 1976.  In the US known from Florida and Eastern Texas and reported from Florida and Mexico by Bessette.


Population and Trends

5 sites x 10 potential sites x 2 genets x 10 ramets = 1000 (Vulnerable)

Lewis has found three populations from 1983 to 2007 all within Big Thicket region of Texas (Hardin, Newton and Tyler Counties). Baroni has a collection from Cayo District of Belize in 2002.  The nature of Florida and Mexico sites is not known.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

Gyroporus phaeocyanescens is a mycorrhizal fungus species so it is dependent on living host trees for population viability. This mutually beneficial symbiotic association between fungus and plant host roots conveys numerous critical advantages for plant host survival. Mycorrhizal fungi are essentially the uptake organs for many nutrients i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus, numerous micronutrients, i.e., boron, selenium, copper, and plays a major role in uptake of water. Both the fungus and the plant host does not exist in nature without each other.
In Belize on a road surface next to Pinus caribea and indeterminate shrubs.  In East Texas it is found in a more xeric environment with oak (Quercus) in the summer.  The nature of the Mexican and Florida sites is not known.

Temperate ForestSubtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

Severe drought and hurricane damage may impact populations due to tree mortality and forest destruction .  The influx of invasive species such as Chinese Tallow (Sapium sebiferum) and Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) has influenced the overall ecology of the region by replacing native hardwoods.  Another problem is the destruction of plants and soil by feral hogs.  In Florida, urban sprawl may influence their population.  Some sites may be converted to pine plantations.  The status of the Belize and Mexico populations is not known.

Trend Unknown/Unrecorded

Conservation Actions

A population in Texas is within Big Thicket National Preserve (Tyler Co.), a federal preserve under the National Park Service, and another from a Nature Conservancy Preserve (Hardin Co.), a private conservation organization.  A Newton Co. site is in a county park that has little disturbance in twenty years.

National level

Research needed

In the gulf coast of North America, where Gyroporus phaeocyanescens is found, there are numerous groups of amateur mycologists. Members of these groups can be recruited and instructed where to find and how to identify G. phaeocyanescens so they can target this species during forays. Data from amateur mycologists can be critical to define G. phaeocyanescens population size, distribution and trends, as well as its ectomycorrhizal associations. Annual forays by Gulf States Mycological Society continues to search for other populations. Lewis continues to monitor areas within Big Thicket National Preserve..

Population size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade


Bibliography

Bessette, A. E., W. C. Roody and A. R. Bessette.  2000.  North American Boletes- A Colored Guide to the Fleshy Pored Mushrooms. 
Syracuse University Press.  400 pp.

Singer, R. , Izonete Araujo & M.H. Ivory. 1983. The Ectotrophically Mycorrhizal Fungi of the Neotropical
Lowlands Especially Central Amazonia.
Beih. Nova Hedwigia 77:1-352.

Singer, R., J. Garcia, and L. D. Gomez.  1990.  The Boletineae of Mexico and Central America I and II. 
Nova Hedwigia Beihefte Band 98:1-74

 


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted