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Arrhenia lobata (Pers.) Kühner & Lamoure ex Redhead

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Scientific name
Arrhenia lobata
Author
(Pers.) Kühner & Lamoure ex Redhead
Common names
Stielloser Adermoosling, Gelappter Adermoosling
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Tricholomataceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT C2a(i)
Proposed by
Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber
Assessors
John Bjarne Jordal, Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, Claudia Perini, Irja Saar
Comments etc.
Anders Dahlberg, Inita Daniele, Izabela L. Kalucka, ISPRA Network for the study of Mycological Diversity, Tatyana Svetasheva, James Westrip

Assessment Notes

Justification

Arrhenia lobata is found from lowland to alpine locations on mosses in wetlands (e.g. springs, fens), but rather rare. Due to the close connection to threatened biotopes, namely flat and transition bogs, as well as Carex-reeds, where the basidiomata sit on wet mosses, at least in temperate areas strongly declining (Krieglsteiner 2001). Since the occurrence tends to be in higher elevations, the species could possibly be even more endangered in Central Europe in the future due to climate warming. There are only 550 occurrences in GBIF, so we estimated the total number of known and unknown localities to be no more than 1500, meaning a total population size of less than 15.000 and number of mature inidivudals in each subpopulation below 1.000 and an ongoing habitat decline. Thus the species is assessed as NT C2(a)(i).


Taxonomic notes


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Arrhenia lobata is found from lowland to alpine locations on mosses in wetlands (e.g. springs, fens), but rather rare. Due to the close connection to threatened biotopes, namely flat and transition bogs, as well as Carex-reeds, where the basidiomata sit on wet mosses, at least in temperate areas strongly declining (Krieglsteiner 2001) Since the occurrence tends to be in higher elevations, the species could possibly be even more endangered in Central Europe in the future due to climate warming. There are only 550 occurrences in GBIF, so we estimated the total number of known and unknown localities to be nor more than 1500, meaning a total population size of less than 10.000 and number of mature inidivudals in each subpopulation below 1.000 and an ongoing habitat decline. Thus the species is assessed as VU C2(a)(i).


Geographic range

This northern hemispheric species is circumpolar distributed in temperate to arctic and in antarctic areas. It is more common in in the arctic-alpine regions than in temperate ones and lowlands. It is much more common in Northern Europe than in North America. We do not consider the very few records from Nigeria, Gabon and Argentina as taxonomically reliably checked. Its status in Australia might be introduced.


Population and Trends

This species has been assessed for national Red Lists across its range, and it is highly threatened in the south of its range, whereas it is fairly secure further north (assessed as LC in Norway, Sweden and Finland). Arrhenia lobata is found from lowland to alpine locations on mosses in wetlands (e.g. springs, fens), but rather rare. Due to the close connection to threatened biotopes, namely flat and transition bogs, as well as Carex-reeds, classified in the European Red List of Habitats (2016) as Vulnerable (D4.2 Arctic-alpine rich fen, D2.2c Intermediate fen and soft-water spring mire), where the basidiomata sit on wet mosses, at least in temperate areas strongly declining (Krieglsteiner 2001) Since the occurrence tends to be in higher elevations, the species could possibly be even more endangered in Central Europe in the future due to climate warming. There are only 550 occurrences in GBIF, so we estimated the total number of known and unknown localities to be no more than 1500. Based on Dahlberg and Mueller (2011) a maximum scaling factor per site could be 10 (assuming only one genet per site) meaning a total population size of less than 15,000 and number of mature individuals in each subpopulation below 1,000 and an ongoing habitat decline.

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Arrhenia lobata is a characteristic and easily recognizable species of sedge meadows, reedbeds, swamps, fens, high mountain grasslands, and snowy soils. It can also be found in humid grasslands or areas where small patches of Sphagnum and other bryophytes are present such as in forests along streams and open heathlands. These habitats are listed in the EU project “Natura 2000” as worthy of protection due to “unfavourable bad” conservation status: Sphagnum and acid bogs (code 7100) and Aapa mires (code 7320).

From northern Europe towards the Mediterranean, these areas gradually become smaller, less widespread and restricted to montane areas. At the southern limit of their distribution, these habitats hosting arctic-alpine plants can be seen as glacial relicts.

Fruiting of this species occurs from summer to autumn.

 

Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands [generally over 8 ha]Alpine Wetlands [includes temporary waters from snowmelt]

Threats

It is endangered by habitat degradation and loss (e.g. habitat conversion, changing hydrology, mining of peat, building recreational facilities), climate change and pollution. Fens and bogs are unique communities that can be destroyed quickly within some days, but require hundreds, if not thousands, of years to form naturally.

Tourism & recreation areasMining & quarryingDams (size unknown)Type Unknown/UnrecordedHabitat shifting & alteration

Conservation Actions

The species can be protected through habitat conservation and preventing the degradation of sites of actual and potential occurrence. This includes, e.g., preventing changes in water regime, avoiding intensification of agriculture and silviculture practices in the neighbouring areas, control over peat extraction, decreasing the impacts of tourism, active prevention of the forest succession and erosion, control over the practices leading to eutrophication, etc, and designating key sites for protection.

Site/area protectionSite/area management

Research needed

Inventory studies and monitoring of known sites, molecular taxonomic studies to determine actual species distribution.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trendsArea-based Management PlanPopulation trends

Use and Trade

This species is distinctive but small and thus does not have any relevance as food or for trading.


Bibliography

 


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted