• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • NTPreliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Beauveria diapheromeriphila (T. Sanjuan & S. Restrepo) T. Sanjuan, B. Shrestha, Kepler & Spatafora

Go to another Suggested Species...

Scientific name
Beauveria diapheromeriphila
Author
(T. Sanjuan & S. Restrepo) T. Sanjuan, B. Shrestha, Kepler & Spatafora
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Cup-fungi, Truffles and Allies
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Sordariomycetes
Order
Hypocreales
Family
Cordycipitaceae
Assessment status
Preliminary Assessed
Preliminary Category
NT A3c+4c
Proposed by
Tatiana Sanjuan
Assessors
Adriana Calle, E. Ricardo Drechsler-Santos, Thiago Kossmann, Kelmer Martins da Cunha, Donald Pfister, Pablo Sandoval-Leiva, Tatiana Sanjuan, Daniela Torres, Aída Vasco-P.
Editors
Gregory Mueller
Reviewers
David Minter

Assessment Notes

Justification

Beauveria diapheromeriphila is an obligate parasite of Diapheromerinae stick bugs. These insects are arboreal and occur in undisturbed tropical rain forests from Mexico to Bolivia. B. diapheromeriphila is known from the wet Amazonian foothills that transition to lowland tropical rain forests. B. diapheromeriphila was initially collected in Ecuador and is also recorded from Colombia, Guyana, and Peru. Morphologically similar material has been collected from Costa Rica and Panama, but these specimens may represent a distinct cryptic species. There is no direct information on population decline of the species, but a significant decline is inferred due to extensive past and ongoing habitat loss and decline in habitat quality due to oil exploitation in the Amazon foothills. A decline of at least 20-25% is estimated


Taxonomic notes

Beauveria diapheromeriphila was described in 2014 from material collected in 2004 in Ecuador (QCNE 186272), and material collected in 2001 in Guyana (PUL 19912). Originally called Cordyceps diapheromeriphila, it is located in the phylogenetic cluster of Beauveria. Globose yellow stromata with pseudoimmersed perithecia growing disseminated on the body of the host are the diagnosis characters of this species.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Beauveria diapheromeriphila is an entomopathogenic fungi that parasitize large stick bugs in the Neotropics. It was reported first time in Ecuador by Evans (1982) but only collected again in 2004 in the same country in the Amazon tropical rain forest, and proposed as a new specie in 2014 including material from Guyana. It have been reported again in 2017 in the border between Colombia and Ecuador in the Napo region. Other four specimens have been reported in the same countries and Costa Rica, Panama and Perú. The localities where these specimens were found are undisturbed or few disturbed montane or lowland tropical rain forest, ecosystem with a anthropic pressure due to oil extraction and land use change.


Geographic range

Beauveria diapheromeriphila is an entomopathogenic fungus which attacks stick bugs from Diapheromeridae family (Phasmidae) which are distributed in the wet Amazonian foothills that are in transition lowland tropical rain forests. B. diapheromeriphila was initially collected in Ecuador, and is also recorded from Colombia, Guyana, and Peru. Morphologically similar material has been collected from Costa Rica and Panama, but these specimens may represent a distinct cryptic species. There are citizen science reports from Panama and Peru.


Population and Trends

The typical locality of Beauveria diapheromeriphila is the Napo biogeographic zone that includes the Amazon foothills from Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. There are also records from Guyana. It has not been found in the lowland Amazon even though there has been exhaustive surveys of Cordyceps s.l. (including Beauveria) in Bolivia and Brazil over the past 16 years. Although morphologically similar specimens has been collected in Panama and Costa Rica, the host appears distinct from the Napo specimens, and these records may represent a distinct cryptic species of Beauveria. There are many cryptic species of Cordyceps s. l. with similar morphlogy but that grow on different hosts that have been identified through DNA analysis. There is no direct information on population decline of the species, but a significant decline is inferred due to extensive past and ongoing habitat loss and decline in habitat quality due to oil explotation in the Amazon foothill. A decline of at least 20-25% is projected

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Beauveria is a commonly encountered and diverse genus of entomopathogenic fungi in the conidial state. Few species are known from the sexual state in the world. B. diapheromeridae is one of three species in the Neotropics that produce the sexual state. Beauveria diapheromeriphila is an obligate parasite of Diapheromerinae stick bugs. These insects are arboreal and occur in undisturbed tropical rain forests from Mexico to Bolivia. The largest stick bugs live in healthy ecosystems and live their entire life in a single tree. When the tree falls or is cut, the stick bug lose its habitat and the individual B. diapheromeriphila loses its host. 

 

Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland ForestSubtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

The main known threat to Beauveria diapheromeriphila is declining habitat and fragmentation due to oil explotation and deforestation. Its known distribution includes the highest activity of oil exploitation in South America. This type of activity, as well as its consequences, put this species at risk throughout its range.

Oil & gas drilling

Conservation Actions

Habitat protection and management are needed, especially control of damage due to oil exploration and extraction.

Site/area protectionPolicies and regulationsNational level

Research needed

Most entomopathogenic fungi are viable to grow in vitro, however some are highly dependent on their host. In the case of this species, the taxonomy and ecology of Diapheromerinae in the Amazon is unknown. Research to better understand the complete life cycles of B. diapheromeriphila is needed to preserve it for future protection.

Population size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecology

Use and Trade

Conidia of species of Beauveria are broadly used around the world as a biopesticide.


Bibliography


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted