• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • Preliminary Assessed
  • VUAssessed
  • 5Published

Crinipellis rubella Bandala, Montoya & Ryoo

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Scientific name
Crinipellis rubella
Author
Bandala, Montoya & Ryoo
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Marasmiaceae
Assessment status
Assessed
Preliminary Category
VU A3c
Proposed by
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Assessors
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Editors
Roberto Garibay Orijel
Contributors
Eduardo Perez Pazos

Assessment Notes

Crinipellis rubella is only known from its type locality in tropical cloud forest in Xalapa city, Veracruz state, eastern Mexico. Crinipellis from Veracruz State were studied in detail in an eight year sampling resulting in a single location for this species (Bandala et al. 2012). So the species does is rare in Veracruz.
However, in Mexico there are unexplored mountain cloud forests in Oaxaca and Chiapas that may host additional subpopulations of the species.
Assuming that the species is restricted to Mountain Cloud Forests, its population is threatened since climate change models predict an estimated decline 68% over the next 60 years of tropical montane cloud forests in Mexico (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).

Justification

Considering the potential distribution of the species, its habitat specificity, and the threats faced by mountain cloud forests, the species should be listed as Vulnerable under criteria A3c, because its subpopulations are suspected to face a reduction in the area and habitat quality of more than 50% in the next 50 years (three generations).


Taxonomic notes

Crinipellis rubella is a small reddish and slender agaric. It belongs to a group of species with tissues turning greenish with KOH, lacking pleurocystidia and growing on dead leaves or twigs. It can be differentiated from these species by its dark reddish to rusty brown pileus with a small, conical central papilla, and an hygrophanous surface; whitish to pale cream yellow lamellae; clavate cheilocystidia, bearing slender apical appendages and then recalling basidia-like forms (Bandala et al. 2012).


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?

Crinipellis rubella is a rare small reddish agaric mushroom only known from its type locality in tropical cloud forest in Xalapa city, Veracruz state, eastern Mexico. Crinipellis from Veracruz State were studied in detail in an eight year sampling resulting in a single location for this species (Bandala et al. 2012). However, in Mexico there are unexplored mountain cloud forests in Oaxaca and Chiapas that may host additional subpopulations of the species.
Assuming that the species is restricted to Mountain Cloud Forests, its population is threatened since climate change models predict an estimated decline 68% over the next 60 years of tropical montane cloud forests in Mexico (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).
The species should be listed as Vulnerable under criteria A3c, because its subpopulations are suspected to face a reduction in the area and habitat quality of more than 50% in the next 50 years (three generations).


Geographic range

Crinipellis rubella is only known from its type locality in tropical cloud forest in Xalapa city, Veracruz state, eastern Mexico.


Population and Trends

The only population registered of Crinipellis rubella is from Xalapa, Veracruz, at Km 2.5 in the old road to Coatepec, Instituto de Ecologia, Santuario del Bosque de Niebla. There are no occurrences of Crinipellis rubella registered in GBIF (GBIF secretariat 2017). Crinipellis from Veracruz State were studied in detail in an eight year sampling resulting in a single location for this species (Bandala et al. 2012). So even while the species may have additional subpopulations in the Mountain Cloud forests of Mexico, in Veracruz it does is rare. Assuming that the species is restricted to Mountain Cloud Forests, its population would be threatened as based on climate change models, tropical montane cloud forests are estimated to decline 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Gregarious. On small twigs and decomposing leaves, in montane cloud (mesophytic) forest dominated by Quercus and Carpinus, at 1300 masl.

Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane Forest

Threats

The subtropical cloud forest, particularly those in Veracruz state are highly threatened due to changes in land uses to convert forests areas into urban territories (Williams-Linera et al. 2015). All the land that surrounds the “Santuario Bosque de Niebla” has been dramatically changed to cattle lands, increasing the isolation of different relicts of this vegetation type across Veracruz state. Also, the areas around the “Instituto de Ecologia A.C.” are urban territories where threats like edge effects and pollution via atmospheric deposits, affect Crinipellis rubella habitat.
Moreover, based on climate change models, tropical montane cloud forests in Mexico are estimated to decline 68% over the next 60 years (Ponce-Reyes et al. 2012).

Housing & urban areasShifting agricultureHabitat shifting & alteration

Conservation Actions

Currently the “Instituto de Ecología A.C.” protects the “Santuario Bosque de Niebla” where the only known subpopulation of Crinipellis rubella is found. Global warming mitigation.

Site/area protectionInternational level

Research needed

To obtain DNA sequences from Crinipellis rubella since when this species was described it was not possible to get any sequences from it (Bandala et al. 2012). An increase in sampling effort to locate some other populations of the species, particularly in mountain cloud forests near the type locality. Being a saprotrophic species could be less constricted to its host.

Population size, distribution & trends

Use and Trade

There is no report about edibility or use of this species.


Bibliography

Bandala, V. M., Ryoo, R., Montoya, L., & Ka, K. H. (2012). New species and new records of Crinipellis from tropical and subtropical forests of the east coast of Mexico. Mycologia, 104(3), 733-745.
Crinipellis rubella Bandala, Montoya & Ryoo, 2012 in GBIF Secretariat (2017). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2019-05-18.
Ponce-Reyes, R., Nicholson, E., Baxter, P. W. J., Fuller, R. A. and Possingham, H. (2012). Extinction risk in cloud forest fragments under climate change and habitat loss. Diversity and Distributions 19, 518–529.
Williams-Linera, G., López-Barrera, F., & Bonilla-Moheno, M. 2015. Estableciendo la línea de base para la restauración del bosque de niebla en un paisaje periurbano. Madera y bosques 21(2): 89-101.


Known distribution - countries

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted