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Arrhenia discorosea (Pilát) E.A. Zvyagina, A.V. Alexandrova, T.M. Bulyonkova

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Scientific name
Arrhenia discorosea
Author
(Pilát) E.A. Zvyagina, A.V. Alexandrova, T.M. Bulyonkova
Common names
Аррения розоводисковая
kalichovka fialovoružová
kalichovka lužní
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Agaricales
Family
Tricholomataceae
Assessment status
Published
Assessment date
2019-03-26
IUCN Red List Category
VU
IUCN Red List Criteria
C2a(i)
Assessors
Krisai-Greilhuber, I.
Reviewers
Svetasheva, T., Dahlberg, A. & Iršėnaitė, R.

Assessment Notes

The content on this page is fetched from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/147129245/147686729

Justification

Arrhenia discorosea is a small but distinct wood-inhabiting saprotrophic fungus with red brown colour and pinkish red lamellae. It is mainly confined to coarse trunks of aspen and poplar, more rarely growing on Fraxinus, Ulmus or Tilia. This species depend on moist and decayed wood and is mostly known from riparian natural forests. The total number of localities is estimated to be less than 1000 and the total population size not to exceed 10 000 mature individuals Old-growth alluvial forest habitats with coarse dead wood have dramatically declined worldwide during the last century. In Europe, almost all original riparian and wetland forests are estimated to be lost. The habitat decline is ongoing and suspected to continue into the future. Therefore,
Arrhenia discorosea is assessed as Vulnerable.

Geographic range

Arrhenia discorosea is a holarctic species present in Europe, Asia and North America.

Population and Trends

Arrhenia discorosea is a widespread but very rare species due to its habitat specialisation. Globally about 100 localities are known (GBIF and various databases). It is known from one site in Belgium and  in Poland. Known occurrences Russian Federation (50), Austria (11), Belgium (1), Bulgaria (1), Czech Republic (2), Germany (6), France (12), Georgia (1), Canada (1), Mongolia (1), Poland (1), and Slovakia (1). The total number of localities is estimated to be less than 1000. We conservatively estimate the number of fungal genotypes per site to be 5. The total population size is estimated as 10,000 mature individuals (cf Dahlberg and Mueller 2011). Old-growth alluvial forest habitats with coarse dead wood have dramatically declined worldwide during the last century.  In Germany it is estimated that only 0.7 % of the original riparian and wetland forest is remaining (230.00 of initially 4 million ha, Welle et al. 2018). The situation is similar in other European countries, e.g. in Austria. Floodplain forest is the most threatened forest type in Europe and is classified as Endangered in the European Red List of habitats (Janssen et al. 2016). The habitat decline is ongoing and suspected to continue into the future.

Population Trend: decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Arrhenia discorosea is a wood inhabiting saprotrophic fungus found on decaying, sometimes standing trunks of  aspen or poplar (Populus), but also other tree species such as Fraxinus, Ulmus and Tilia. The species is a typical representative of the floodplain forest. It also occurs in old-growth deciduous forests and in dark conifer forests mixed with aspen on trunks in final decay stage..


Threats

Threats to Arrhenia discorosea are caused by habitat destruction and decline due to draining of riparian forests and clear-felling of trees (cf. Hughes et al. 2012). It is negatively affected by removal of coarse woody debris.


Conservation Actions

Sites with Arrhenia discorosea should be protected and coarse woody debris should be left. It is important to leave a high amount of living and dead aspen trees.




Use and Trade

It is not known to be used.

Source and Citation

Krisai-Greilhuber, I. 2019. Arrhenia discorosea. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T147129245A147686729. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-2.RLTS.T147129245A147686729.en .Downloaded on 30 January 2021

Country occurrence